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Mercury, Vaccines and the CDC's Worst Nightmare

RS: Are you confident you would win that debate?

RFK, JR: Yes. I will obliterate them. It's not because I'm a great debater, it's just that they have no factual basis for their assertions. I've read virtually all the science—both sides—and I know the flimsiness of the reed upon which they rest their theology.

RS: You said this is the sickest generation in history. Is this hyperbole?

RFK, JR: Ask any school nurse who has been around for a few decades. In addition to autism, we now have epidemics of other neurological disorders like ADD, ADHD, tics and narcolepsy, SIDS, and seizure disorder. The CDC says that one in every six US children now suffers from a developmental disorder. This is not normal. Asthma and food allergies are also suddenly exploding in the same thimerosal-exposed generation. School infirmaries have whole cupboards for the Epi pens and inhalers. All of these conditions are associated in the scientific literature with vaccines, mercury, and with thimerosal specifically. Think about when you were in school. How many people did you know with peanut allergies and autism? EPA scientists found that the greatest increase in ASD prevalence occurred in cohorts born between 1987 and 1992. The so called "changepoint year" was 1988. That's the timeframe that the CDC began expanding the vaccine schedule, increasing mercury exposures from 75mcg to 237.5 mcg before the second birthday.

RS: The fact that it's mainly boys who are injured is additional evidence of mercury's central role?

RFK, JR: Mercury disproportionately affects boys because testosterone amplifies the neurotoxic effects of mercury. Conversely, estrogen wraps the mercury molecule and protects the female brain. That's why these disorders tend to selectively affect males and girls with unusually high testosterone. Any scientist genuinely searching for the cause of this epidemic must begin by identifying a toxin that suddenly increased across every demographic in 1988 and affects boys at a 4 to 1 ratio.

RS: Parents of vaccine-injured children were heartened to learn that you and your law partner are trying to subpoena CDC whistleblower, Dr. William Thompson for the Hazelhurst case in Tennessee. Can you let our readers know how that's going?

RFK, JR: Yeah, Bryan Smith of Morgan and Morgan is the kind of extraordinary bulldog plaintiff's lawyer that makes Pharm tremble. Our Client, Yates Hazelhurst, regressed into autism after receiving vaccines that included thimerosal.

Yates' case survived the dismissal of the other 5,000 cases in the Omnibus Autism Proceeding. His is the only case in 30 years that has been allowed to allege that vaccines can cause autism. His case survived because Yates' parents sued not just the pharmaceutical company but also Yates' pediatrician for breaching his standard of care. The biggest impediments against Yates' prevailing are the 2004 IOM declaration that vaccines are not linked to autism and the Supreme Court's Bruesewitz holding which relied on the IOM. These decisions both rested heavily on Dr. Thompson's Pediatrics study published in 2004. Dr. Thompson now says that the study was the product of fraud, data manipulation, and data destruction. That study has been cited in at least 110 subsequent studies published in PubMed and is the principle foundation of the orthodoxy that vaccines are not causing autism. We've asked to subpoena Dr. Thompson because his testimony will show that the central foundation stone for the orthodoxy is fraudulent. Under federal law, you can't subpoena a federal agency employee unless you can show that his testimony couldn't be obtained from any other source. Of course, that's true in this case because there were only 4 people who witnessed the CDC data dump and nobody else is talking. However, the federal law requires that the first step in that process is to petition the head of the agency and ask for permission to subpoena the employee. CDC Director Dr. Thomas Friedan denied our request, which was not a surprise. The CDC has much to lose from Thompson's truthful testimony. We are now appealing that decision in federal court.

RS: How can people who want to help with your efforts get involved?

RFK, JR: They can go to our website and sign up to be members of the World Mercury Project. Also, because we're going to litigate against the CDC and certain state health commissioners, we need members for standing. If you're willing to be a member for standing and you have a child injured by thimerosal or if you yourself were injured by thimerosal, let us know. Even if you have no known vaccine injuries in your family, we can use you. Right now we are trying to sign up pregnant women and parents with young children for planned litigation in New York, California, Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, and Delaware. We would love to sign you up as a member. That doesn't mean you'll be involved in the litigation. In most cases, we would just need to get an affidavit from you. We need to sign up as many parents of vaccine-injured children as possible. Just go to the World Mercury Project website and say you support our efforts.

Parents and vaccine safety advocates gathered in October at the CDC to protest the agency's vaccine research fraud. (Left to Right) Catherine Masha, Tony Muhammad, Stefanie Van, Cynthia Reece.

RS: Is there anything we as parents can do?

RFK, JR: World Mercury Project also has an effort we're calling our Virtual Senate Hearing Project where we are getting mothers and fathers to tell their stories about their vaccine-injured children. We are working with the Vaxxed team on this project. We need short home videos, less than two minutes. We want parents to tell their stories as if they were speaking in a Senate hearing. We welcome the participation of anyone who has a vaccine-injury story to tell. We want to create an archive of stories from the autism generation. Just go to the website for instructions.

RS: Earlier, you mentioned the heavy toll it takes on scientists and celebrities to question vaccine safety. Do you have concerns about your own career and reputation or safety for speaking out on vaccine injury?

RFK, JR: Those things are irrelevant to me. The injuries that I've suffered from a decade of attacks by Pharma's trolls and toadies are dwarfed by the agonies experienced by an autistic child and his family during a single hour of any single day. I don't know what to make of the countless journalists, scientists and doctors who have told me that they can't speak up because of their careers…or maybe I do. Einstein said that "The world is a dangerous place not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing."

For more information on the World Autism Project and to get involved, click here.

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