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Mercury, Vaccines and the CDC's Worst Nightmare

RS: How does the press help to enforce the orthodoxy?

RFK, JR: Newspapers and electronic media outlets have suppressed legitimate debate over vaccine safety or the ongoing corruption scandals at the CDC. They allow Paul Offit and other pharma shills almost unlimited use of the airwaves to spout Pharma propaganda—always unquestioned and unanswered. Newspapers won't publish Op Eds or letters or comments from vaccine safety advocates. Even alternative press—like Huffington Post, Drudge Report, Salon, Slate and Mother Jones won't allow discussion—and these are supposedly the antidote to a corporate controlled media. Astonishingly, many journalists openly advocate the censoring of any discussion about vaccine safety.

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and Polly Tommey join forces to educate the public on vaccine injury.Josh Coleman

RS: When parents first started talking to the media about thimerosal around 2002, we could get a lot of good coverage. Now it's nearly impossible to get any mainstream press at all, even at the local level. What has your experience been like in getting coverage on the link between thimerosal and autism?

RFK, JR: It's Kafkaesque. It's an impenetrable cocoon of censorship. Talking to reporters about this is like dealing with the Borg. Investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson calls it the most censored story of the century. It's bewildering for me to see the American press cowed before government officials. It ought to be humiliating. Daniel Schulman pointed out in the Columbia Journalism Review that all this journalistic reticence is rooted in fear. He called the controversy "career ending" for journalists. Reporters know if they talk about this, they're going to lose their jobs. Nobody reads the science. Reporters don't even read the abstracts. I've yet to find a reporter—even so-called science reporters like Keith Kloor who writes about this issue regularly—who has read the relevant science. It is really quite frightening. The blackout is complete, as DeNiro learned when he tried to screen Vaxxed in SoHo. They have abolished discussion from the public square. The American press has a lot of explaining to do and hopefully a lot of soul-searching.

RS: Have you personally experienced censorship in speaking out about injuries caused by thimerosal-containing vaccines?

RFK, JR: Yes, many times. I could spend this entire interview chronicling the stories. It would soon sound like whining. The biggest disappointment has been The New York Times. I love that paper; it's such a critical institution for our country and our democracy! They made the dreadful mistake, cheerleading the run up to the Iraq War. They were manipulated by undeserving public officials. They had to apologize for leading our country into that costly quagmire. Their mistake on the thimerosal issue has been even more costly. I've met and corresponded repeatedly with the reporters, columnists, the science editors, editorial board and the public editor. I've written letter after letter. I brought a squadron of scientists and dragged a pile of scientific studies into a meeting with the paper's editorial board. They gave me the meeting, but all of them were sullen and impervious. They refused to even look at the studies. It's tragic because their evangelical message discipline on thimerosal's supposed safety has anointed the CDC narrative with moral authority among less rigorous news outlets.

RS: Is it all about the advertising dollars then?

RFK, JR: It's more complex. The media's silence on this issue is not simply a quid pro quo for billions of dollars of annual pharmaceutical advertising. Most reporters and media outlets accept the muzzle because they think they are safeguarding public health. They believe that allowing debate about vaccine safety and CDC corruption may cause the public to stop vaccinating.

Julianna Pearce

RS: Do you think that's a legitimate rationale?

RFK, JR: It's not black and white. There have been times in American history when journalists have agreed, legitimately, to hold stories for brief periods of time for national security reasons but it's always a slippery slope. And, this situation is unique. The embargo has lasted a decade. Journalism is wandering into a minefield when media outlets take on the responsibility of protecting Americans from dangerous knowledge. Democracy is messy and difficult, but I think journalists nearly always need to come down on the side of transparency. And I don't think that coming clean will destroy the vaccine program. As the late NIH Director Bernadine Healy said, "Americans are smarter than that." Healy believed that a vigorous and open debate would not diminish but rather strengthen the vaccine program.

RS: Is there any evidence that insulation from scrutiny has actually strengthened the vaccine program?

RFK, JR: That's the irony. Rather than strengthening public support for vaccines, the laws that shield the vaccine industry from lawsuits combined with the absence of political and press scrutiny, have emboldened the CDC to sanction increasingly reckless conduct by vaccine makers. Because the press won't cover CDC corruption, we now have a rogue agency that's completely unaccountable. Its senior vaccine safety scientist has just come forward to admit that the CDC routinely destroys data. Its key studies are fraudulent. If what Dr. Thompson is saying is true, the implications are monumental. It means that CDC officials knowingly sanctioned the unnecessary injection of brain killing poison into an entire generation of American children, and children all over the world.

RS: What about the vaccine companies?

RFK, JR: The pharmaceutical companies know that nothing they do will be questioned when it comes to vaccines. Look, just use common sense. Every year, we see million, or even billion-dollar litigation settlements against Merck, Pfizer, Novartis, Glaxo, Abbott, and Lilly for false marketing, off label uses, adulterated products, falsifying science, kickbacks and fraudulent safety data in their pharmaceutical products. Just a couple months ago, vaccine maker Glaxo Smith Kline paid $20 million to the SEC to settle charges of funneling $489 million in bribes to physicians in China. We see shenanigans like that all the time in the United States and there's this whole industry of trial lawyers making very good livelihoods telling those stories to juries. How do you imagine those same companies would behave if they suddenly got rid of the lawyers, the courts, the depositions, the class action lawsuits, and the multi-district litigations? What would happen if they then got rid of the press? Why in the world do we think that these same companies have somehow made their vaccine programs off limits to these crooked strategies? It's a comical fiction. You have to be almost purposefully naive to believe it. And yet, America's most prestigious media outlets have all been gulled into swallowing it.

RS: How do we get the mainstream media to finally cover this issue honestly?

RFK, JR: We have to make this such a potent presence on social media that it gives mainstream reporters a sense they can now proceed safely. We just need a few journalists to break rank, look at the science and write the truth. The moment we succeed in forcing the debate, this entire pretense will collapse. Everyone will see that the emperor has no clothes. By stacking fraud upon fraud upon fraud, the CDC has created an edifice so high, so wobbly and so fragile that a light breeze of scrutiny will bring the whole thing tumbling down. You can accomplish the same thing—forcing debate—with a lawsuit or you can do it with a single courageous news outlet. If the Atlanta Journal-Constitution did a series on CDC corruption or if 60 Minutes did a segment investigating the science? Game over! CDC has no science to support its position that isn't blatantly fraudulent. These fabricated epidemiological studies are comical. All we need to do is force the debate.

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