Quantcast
Popular

Mercury, Vaccines and the CDC's Worst Nightmare

RS: How does the press help to enforce the orthodoxy?

RFK, JR: Newspapers and electronic media outlets have suppressed legitimate debate over vaccine safety or the ongoing corruption scandals at the CDC. They allow Paul Offit and other pharma shills almost unlimited use of the airwaves to spout Pharma propaganda—always unquestioned and unanswered. Newspapers won't publish Op Eds or letters or comments from vaccine safety advocates. Even alternative press—like Huffington Post, Drudge Report, Salon, Slate and Mother Jones won't allow discussion—and these are supposedly the antidote to a corporate controlled media. Astonishingly, many journalists openly advocate the censoring of any discussion about vaccine safety.

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and Polly Tommey join forces to educate the public on vaccine injury.Josh Coleman

RS: When parents first started talking to the media about thimerosal around 2002, we could get a lot of good coverage. Now it's nearly impossible to get any mainstream press at all, even at the local level. What has your experience been like in getting coverage on the link between thimerosal and autism?

RFK, JR: It's Kafkaesque. It's an impenetrable cocoon of censorship. Talking to reporters about this is like dealing with the Borg. Investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson calls it the most censored story of the century. It's bewildering for me to see the American press cowed before government officials. It ought to be humiliating. Daniel Schulman pointed out in the Columbia Journalism Review that all this journalistic reticence is rooted in fear. He called the controversy "career ending" for journalists. Reporters know if they talk about this, they're going to lose their jobs. Nobody reads the science. Reporters don't even read the abstracts. I've yet to find a reporter—even so-called science reporters like Keith Kloor who writes about this issue regularly—who has read the relevant science. It is really quite frightening. The blackout is complete, as DeNiro learned when he tried to screen Vaxxed in SoHo. They have abolished discussion from the public square. The American press has a lot of explaining to do and hopefully a lot of soul-searching.

RS: Have you personally experienced censorship in speaking out about injuries caused by thimerosal-containing vaccines?

RFK, JR: Yes, many times. I could spend this entire interview chronicling the stories. It would soon sound like whining. The biggest disappointment has been The New York Times. I love that paper; it's such a critical institution for our country and our democracy! They made the dreadful mistake, cheerleading the run up to the Iraq War. They were manipulated by undeserving public officials. They had to apologize for leading our country into that costly quagmire. Their mistake on the thimerosal issue has been even more costly. I've met and corresponded repeatedly with the reporters, columnists, the science editors, editorial board and the public editor. I've written letter after letter. I brought a squadron of scientists and dragged a pile of scientific studies into a meeting with the paper's editorial board. They gave me the meeting, but all of them were sullen and impervious. They refused to even look at the studies. It's tragic because their evangelical message discipline on thimerosal's supposed safety has anointed the CDC narrative with moral authority among less rigorous news outlets.

RS: Is it all about the advertising dollars then?

RFK, JR: It's more complex. The media's silence on this issue is not simply a quid pro quo for billions of dollars of annual pharmaceutical advertising. Most reporters and media outlets accept the muzzle because they think they are safeguarding public health. They believe that allowing debate about vaccine safety and CDC corruption may cause the public to stop vaccinating.

Julianna Pearce

RS: Do you think that's a legitimate rationale?

RFK, JR: It's not black and white. There have been times in American history when journalists have agreed, legitimately, to hold stories for brief periods of time for national security reasons but it's always a slippery slope. And, this situation is unique. The embargo has lasted a decade. Journalism is wandering into a minefield when media outlets take on the responsibility of protecting Americans from dangerous knowledge. Democracy is messy and difficult, but I think journalists nearly always need to come down on the side of transparency. And I don't think that coming clean will destroy the vaccine program. As the late NIH Director Bernadine Healy said, "Americans are smarter than that." Healy believed that a vigorous and open debate would not diminish but rather strengthen the vaccine program.

RS: Is there any evidence that insulation from scrutiny has actually strengthened the vaccine program?

RFK, JR: That's the irony. Rather than strengthening public support for vaccines, the laws that shield the vaccine industry from lawsuits combined with the absence of political and press scrutiny, have emboldened the CDC to sanction increasingly reckless conduct by vaccine makers. Because the press won't cover CDC corruption, we now have a rogue agency that's completely unaccountable. Its senior vaccine safety scientist has just come forward to admit that the CDC routinely destroys data. Its key studies are fraudulent. If what Dr. Thompson is saying is true, the implications are monumental. It means that CDC officials knowingly sanctioned the unnecessary injection of brain killing poison into an entire generation of American children, and children all over the world.

RS: What about the vaccine companies?

RFK, JR: The pharmaceutical companies know that nothing they do will be questioned when it comes to vaccines. Look, just use common sense. Every year, we see million, or even billion-dollar litigation settlements against Merck, Pfizer, Novartis, Glaxo, Abbott, and Lilly for false marketing, off label uses, adulterated products, falsifying science, kickbacks and fraudulent safety data in their pharmaceutical products. Just a couple months ago, vaccine maker Glaxo Smith Kline paid $20 million to the SEC to settle charges of funneling $489 million in bribes to physicians in China. We see shenanigans like that all the time in the United States and there's this whole industry of trial lawyers making very good livelihoods telling those stories to juries. How do you imagine those same companies would behave if they suddenly got rid of the lawyers, the courts, the depositions, the class action lawsuits, and the multi-district litigations? What would happen if they then got rid of the press? Why in the world do we think that these same companies have somehow made their vaccine programs off limits to these crooked strategies? It's a comical fiction. You have to be almost purposefully naive to believe it. And yet, America's most prestigious media outlets have all been gulled into swallowing it.

RS: How do we get the mainstream media to finally cover this issue honestly?

RFK, JR: We have to make this such a potent presence on social media that it gives mainstream reporters a sense they can now proceed safely. We just need a few journalists to break rank, look at the science and write the truth. The moment we succeed in forcing the debate, this entire pretense will collapse. Everyone will see that the emperor has no clothes. By stacking fraud upon fraud upon fraud, the CDC has created an edifice so high, so wobbly and so fragile that a light breeze of scrutiny will bring the whole thing tumbling down. You can accomplish the same thing—forcing debate—with a lawsuit or you can do it with a single courageous news outlet. If the Atlanta Journal-Constitution did a series on CDC corruption or if 60 Minutes did a segment investigating the science? Game over! CDC has no science to support its position that isn't blatantly fraudulent. These fabricated epidemiological studies are comical. All we need to do is force the debate.

Prev Page
Next Page
Show Comments ()
Sponsored
Popular

5 Recent Victories for the Oceans

By Andy Sharpless

In the last several weeks, Oceana and its allies won five important victories that will help protect biodiversity and increase abundance in our seas:

Keep reading... Show less
Snow in Atlanta on Jan. 17, 2018. Lisa Panero / Flickr

Climate Change and Weather Extremes: Both Heat and Cold Can Kill

By Garth Heutel, David Molitor and Nolan Miller

Climate change is increasing the frequency and strength of some types of extreme weather in the U.S., particularly heat waves. Last summer the U.S. Southwest experienced life-threatening heat waves, which are especially dangerous for elderly people and other vulnerable populations.

More recently, record-setting cold temperatures engulfed much of the country during the first week of 2018. This arctic blast has been blamed for dozens of deaths. Some scientists believe that Arctic warming may be a factor in this type of persistent cold spell, although others question this connection.

Keep reading... Show less
Trump Watch
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Cristian L. Ricardo

One Year Into the Trump Administration, Where Do We Stand?

By John R. Platt

What a long, strange year it's been.

Saturday, Jan. 20 marks the one-year anniversary of the Trump administration officially taking office after a long and arduous election. It's a year that has seen seemingly unending attacks on science and the environment, along with a rise in hateful rhetoric and racially motivated policies. But it's almost been met by the continuing growth of the efforts to resist what the Trump administration has to offer.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular

Chris J. Ratcliffe / Greenpeace

Greenpeace Slams Coca-Cola Plastic Announcement as ‘Dodging the Main Issue’

By Louise Edge

Friday Greenpeace criticized Coca-Cola's new global plastics plan for failing to address the urgency of ocean plastic pollution.

The long awaited policy from the world's largest soft drink company featured a series of measures weaker than those previously announced for Europe and the UK.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Animals
The two young Iowa vandals knocked over 50 hives and exposed the bees to deadly winter temperatures. Colby Stopa / Flickr

Two Boys Charged With Killing Half a Million Honeybees in Iowa

Two boys were charged with killing more than a half million bees at a honey business in Iowa last month.

"All of the beehives on the honey farm were destroyed and approximately 500,000 bees perished in the frigid temperatures," Sioux City police said in a release.

Keep reading... Show less
Energy

Are Microwaves Really as Bad for the Environment as Cars?

According to many headlines blared around the Internet this week, "microwaves are as damaging to the environment as cars." But this misleading information, based on a new study from the University of Manchester, hopefully doesn't make you feel guilty about zapping your next Hot Pocket.

The research, published in the journal Science of the Total Environment, found that microwave ovens across the European Union generate as much carbon dioxide as nearly 7 million cars and consume an estimated 9.4 terawatts per hour of electricity per year. Okay, that sounds like a lot. But also consider that there are about 130 million microwaves in Europe and some 291 million vehicles on its roads.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
GMO

Monsanto's Roundup Destroys Healthy Microbes in Humans and in Soils

By Julie Wilson

We're only beginning to learn the importance of healthy gut bacteria to our overall health—and the relationship between healthy soil and the human microbiome.

We know that the human microbiome, often referred to as our "second brain," plays a key role in our health, from helping us digest the food we eat, to boosting our brain function and regulating our immune systems.

Keep reading... Show less
Trump Watch
Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke refused to meet with National Park System Advisory Board members last year, prompting most of them to quit. Gage Skidmore / Flickr

From National Parks to the EPA, Trump Administration Stiff-Arms Science Advisers

By Elliott Negin

The Trump administration's testy relationship with science reminds me of that old saying: Advice is least heeded when most needed.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!