Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Keep Genetically Engineered Sweet Corn Off Your Plate

GMO
Keep Genetically Engineered Sweet Corn Off Your Plate

Food & Water Watch

Genetically engineered (GE) Monsanto sweet corn is approved and could be on your plate next year. GE sweet corn—the first Monsanto crop designed to be consumed by people—is engineered to produce pesticides and resist herbicides. Sign the petition to make sure your grocery store doesn't sell you genetically engineered sweet corn.

Why should you be concerned about Monsanto's GE sweet corn?

1) This is the first GE crop that Monsanto is marketing for direct human consumption.

2) It won't be labeled.

3) It hasn't been tested for human safety.

Monsanto's sweet corn variety flew through the approval process because it combines two genetically engineered traits that were approved in 2005 and 2008. The U.S. Department of Agriculture does no independent testing of GE crops, and the stacked combination of these traits for herbicide resistance and pesticide production has never been through a safety evaluation of any kind.

These traits have never been engineered into a food that will be consumed directly by people. Most of the GE corn that is currently grown is eaten by animals or processed into corn syrup, corn oil and other corn ingredients that show up in processed food. Monsanto's aiming to have their new GE sweet corn grown on 250,000 acres next year (roughly 40 percent of the sweet corn market). Take action now to make sure this corn isn't sold at your local grocery store.

As you already know, genetically engineered crops are not required to be labeled. We have no way of knowing if a food has been genetically engineered or contains GE ingredients. We believe labeling should be required so that people can choose whether or not they want to eat GE foods. Unfortunately, GE sweet corn won't be labeled and doesn't look any different from regular sweet corn.

Help make sure GE sweet corn is not sold by signing our petition to grocery stores. We'll be delivering this petition to the top ten grocery store chains in the country in an attempt to stop GE sweet corn from reaching your plate.

For more information or to sign the petition to grocery stores, click here.

A hiker looking up at a Redwood tree in Redwoods State Park. Rich Wheater / Getty Images
By Douglas Broom
  • Redwoods are the world's tallest trees.
  • Now scientists have discovered they are even bigger than we thought.
  • Using laser technology they map the 80-meter giants.
  • Trees are a key plank in the fight against climate change.

They are among the largest trees in the world, descendants of forests where dinosaurs roamed.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A female condor above the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County, California. Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

One environmental downside to wind turbines is their impact on birds.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Kentucky received record-breaking rainfall and flooding this past weekend. Keith Getter / Getty Images

Kentucky is coping with historic flooding after a weekend of record-breaking rainfall, enduring water rescues, evacuations and emergency declarations.

Read More Show Less
The Forest Vixen's CC Photo Stream. Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Spring is coming. And soon, tree swallows will start building nests. But as the climate changes, the birds are nesting earlier in the spring.

Read More Show Less
An Exxon oil refinery is seen at night. Jim Sugar / Getty Images

Citigroup will strive to reach net-zero greenhouse gas pollution across its lending portfolio by 2050 and in its own operations by 2030, the investment group announced Monday.

Read More Show Less