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June Was Earth's 14th Straight Record Warm Month, Greenland Loses Shocking 1 Trillion Tons of Ice

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June has continued the unprecedented heat streak for the 14th month, with globally averaged temperatures being a full 1.62 F (0.9 C) warmer than the average across the 20th century, according to the latest data by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and confirmed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

NOAA

The effects of last year's El Niño, which contributed to spike in temperatures, is fading but the record heat streak over the Earth has remained. According to NOAA, the first half of 2016 was 0.36 F (0.2 C) warmer than last year and this year is on track to becoming the third consecutive year to set a new global heat record.

This image was taken aboard a NASA research flight over the Chukchi Sea in the Arctic on July 16.NASA

Another indication of warming is Greenland's melting ice. A satellite study has also shown that Greenland has lost a shocking 1 trillion tons of ice in just four years between 2011 and 2014. Ice loss from Greenland, which has been 9 trillion tons in the past century, may have contributed to a full inch of sea-level rise in the last 100 years.

For a deeper dive:

Record Month: Washington Post, AP, Bloomberg, USA Today, New York Times, Climate Central, Phys.org, NPR, Tech Insider

Greenland: Washington Post, Gizmodo

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