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July Ties for Hottest Month on Record

Climate
Global average temperature anomalies during July, 2017. NASA GISS

Last month tied July 2016 as the hottest July in recorded history, according to a preliminary analysis by NASA.

And as a result, it also statistically tied with August 2016 and July 2016 as the hottest months ever recorded. Mashable's Andrew Freedman noted that this record is even more noteworthy because it occurred in the absence of an El Niño, which combined with long-term planetary warming makes 2016 the hottest year ever.


Last month was about 0.83°C, or 1.49°F warmer than the monthly 1951-1980 July average. Eyes now are on NOAA's monthly report expected in a few days to see if it corroborates the analysis.

According to the executive summary of a climate report drafted by 13 federal agencies:

"Thousands of studies conducted by tens of thousands of scientists around the world have documented changes in surface, atmospheric and oceanic temperatures; melting glaciers; disappearing snow cover; shrinking sea ice; rising sea level; and an increase in atmospheric water vapor ... The last few years have also seen record-breaking, climate-related weather extremes, as well as the warmest years on record for the globe."

As reported by Mashable, Earth has not had a cooler than average month since December 1984.

For a deeper dive:

Mashable, Gizmodo, Grist. Comment: ThinkProgress, Joe Romm column

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