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Josh Fox: Arrest of Journalists Covering the Dakota Pipeline Is a Threat to Democracy

Energy

Are North Dakota authorities waging a war against the public's right to know about the ongoing Standing Rock pipeline protests?

We are joined by documentary filmmaker Deia Schlosberg, who was charged earlier this month with three felonies for filming an act of civil disobedience in which climate activists manually turned off the safety valves to stop the flow of tar sands oil through pipelines spanning the U.S. and Canada.

The actions took place in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and Washington state. Schlosberg is an award-winning filmmaker and was the producer of Josh Fox's recent documentary, How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things Climate Can't Change. She was filming the action at a valve station owned by TransCanada in Walhalla, North Dakota. She was arrested along with the activists and her footage was confiscated. Then she was charged with a Class A felony and two Class C felonies—which combined carry a 45-year maximum sentence.

Award-winning filmmaker Josh Fox joins us to discuss the arrest of fellow filmmaker Deia Schlosberg.

"These people are not accessories to the crime, they are they media," Fox said. "This is a constitutionally protected activity."

Reposted with permission from our media associate Democracy Now!

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