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Josh Fox and Mark Ruffalo Invite You to Stop the Frack Attack

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Josh Fox and Mark Ruffalo Invite You to Stop the Frack Attack

Stop the Frack Attack

By Robby Diesu

Bill McKibben of 350.org, Josh Fox of the documentary film Gasland and Mike Tidwell of Chesapeake Climate Action Network are just some of the names of the incredibly powerful speakers who will be joining us on July 28 in Washington, D.C. at Stop the Frack Attack, the nation's largest-ever anti-fracking rally. We will also hear from Dayne Pratzky, who is fighting fracking in Australia; Lori New Breast of Blackfeet Women Against Fracking; cancer survivor Laura Amos; Kari Matsko, who helped start the battle against fracking in Ohio and many more. For a full list of speakers, click here.

Something you might notice about our speakers is that they are mostly local people taking up the fight against fracking. From the beginning, Stop the Frack Attack has been led by our advisory committee—11 individuals who have put in countless hours to make sure this event reflects the movement on the ground. They chose the speakers because, to them, they are the ones who best represent the anti-fracking movement.

We also want to draw your attention to our newest video from Mark Ruffalo and Josh Fox, inviting you to Stop the Frack Attack. You might also notice that they hint at our next steps, making sure New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo makes the right decisions about fracking in his state.

Don't forget to check out the Stop the Frack Attack website for detailed information on Lobby Day and the National Gathering that lead up to the day of action.

Visit EcoWatch's FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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