Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Jon Stewart Slams Conservatives and Supreme Court for Letting Big Business Win Again

Energy

The Supreme Court has been handing down some significant decisions in the last week. Justices ruled in favor of the Affordable Care Act and same-sex marriage and provided hope for proponents of gerrymandering.

They also ruled in favor of Oklahoma's controversial lethal injection drug and against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), putting roadblocks on its ability to regulate health-damaging pollutants from power plants.

On The Daily Show, Jon Stewart shows clips of conservative pundits lamenting the "Obamacare" and gay marriage rulings and chalking up the lethal injection and EPA rulings as victories for conservatives, which wholeheartedly confuses Stewart.

“So yes, gay people have the right to marry, and poor people have the right to insurance—but on the bright side, Americans can still kill prisoners painfully and everyone else slowly," Stewart summarized.

Fox News, in particular, celebrated the EPA defeat as a "victory for business." "You seem really giddy about that victory," says Stewart. "You know the losing team in that game was lungs. You know that, right?"

Stewart turns to his senior correspondent Jason Klepper to bring some clarity to the discussion.

"After a week of redefining what marriage is and doling out health care, the Supreme Court has finally brought justice back to America. Remember America?, Klepper asks rhetorically. "A place where big business always wins, where it's a little hard to breathe and where we get to decide how super painful to make your death. I mean that's the country I'm proud to fly my confederate flag over," says Klepper.

Watch the full segment which is broken up into two parts here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Supreme Court Restricts EPA’s Ability to Regulate Toxic Emissions From Power Plants

June 2015 Smashes Heat and Rainfall Records in U.S.

Q & A With Green Party Presidential Candidate Jill Stein

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Critics charge the legislation induces poor communities to sell off their water rights. Pexels

By Eoin Higgins

Over 300 groups on Monday urged Senate leadership to reject a bill currently under consideration that would incentivize communities to sell off their public water supplies to private companies for pennies on the dollar.

Read More Show Less
People enjoy outdoor dining along Pier Ave. in Hermosa Beach, California on July 8, 2020. Keith Birmingham / MediaNews Group / Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

California is reversing its reopening plans amidst a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

Read More Show Less
A protest against the name of the Washington Redskins in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Nov. 2, 2014. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

The Washington Redskins will retire their controversial name and logo, the National Football League (NFL) team announced Monday.

Read More Show Less
The survival tools northern fish have used for millennia could be a disadvantage as environmental conditions warm and more fast-paced species move in. Istvan Banyai / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Alyssa Murdoch, Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle and Sapna Sharma

Summer has finally arrived in the northern reaches of Canada and Alaska, liberating hundreds of thousands of northern stream fish from their wintering habitats.

Read More Show Less
A mother walks her children through a fountain on a warm summer day on July 12, 2020 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Gary Hershorn / Getty Images

A heat wave that set in over the South and Southwest left much of the U.S. blanketed in record-breaking triple digit temperatures over the weekend. The widespread and intense heat wave will last for weeks, making the magnitude and duration of its heat impressive, according to The Washington Post.

Read More Show Less
If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus. blackCAT / Getty Images

By Joni Sweet

If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Aerial view of burnt areas of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia state, Brazil, on Aug. 24, 2019. CARLOS FABAL / AFP via Getty Images

NASA scientists say that warmer than average surface sea temperatures in the North Atlantic raise the concern for a more active hurricane season, as well as for wildfires in the Amazon thousands of miles away, according to Newsweek.

Read More Show Less