Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Jon Stewart Prepares for Life After the Daily Show

Jon Stewart Prepares for Life After the Daily Show

Jon Stewart is preparing for life after The Daily Show. If you're like me you're dreading the day he departs the show in August, but, of course, news has already broke of Stewart's next venture. He and his wife, Tracey, reportedly decided to purchase a farm in New Jersey to house their impressive amount of rescue animals and potentially many more, according to Ecorazzi. The Stewart clan already contains two children, four dogs, two horses, two pigs, three rabbits, two guinea pigs, two hamsters, one parrot and two fish. "All rescues,” Tracey told USA Today of her enormous brood. “Except for the children.”

Jon Stewart and one of his rescued pit bulls. Photo credit: Pinterest

The move should come as no surprise to Daily Show fans. Stewart has been a consistent animal advocate throughout his time on the air. Most notably, he skewered Gov. Christie on vetoing a popular gestation crate ban. He also recently hosted Gene Baur of Farm Sanctuary to discuss animal rescue and veganism and John Hargrove, the former SeaWorld employee who became a whistleblower on the company's animal cruelty.

Stewart's wife, Tracey, a vegan and former veterinary technician, is also a vocal animal advocate. She’s the editor-in-chief of the online parenting magazine Moomah, whose April 2015 issue is entirely dedicated to veganism with the featured story being Gene Baur's new book, Living the Farm Sanctuary Life.

“The joy of interacting with animals as friends instead of using them for human consumption is life-changing,” Tracey told Ecorazzi. “A trip to Farm Sanctuary should be on everyone’s to-do list, but you can also bring a little bit of sanctuary home when you sponsor an animal through the Adopt a Farm Animal Program.” Tracey is even writing a book herself due out in October, Do Unto Animals, which promises to be a humorous and insightful look into the secret lives of animals and a guide for how to live alongside them. A portion of the proceeds will go to, you guessed it, Farm Sanctuary.

We at EcoWatch are sad to see Stewart leave The Daily Show, but we are so excited (and not at all surprised) to see that he will continue to do great things. If you haven't seen his interview with Gene Baur, you should definitely check it out here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Jon Stewart: Honestly Governor Christie, 'Let the [Pregnant] Pigs Turn Around'

Jon Stewart: Going Vegan Is the Solution to So Many of the World's Problems

SeaWorld Whistleblower Tells Jon Stewart 'Morally This is Just Not Right'

Radiation-contaminated water tanks and damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Japan will release radioactive wastewater from the failed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government announced on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less