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Jon Stewart Highlights Earthquakes, Chevron's Pizza and Other ‘Benefits' of Fracking

Fracking

Examining the pure lunacy within the excuses of pro-fracking companies, politicians and advocates is the only way the practice's well-documented dangers could possibly make for a laughing matter. 

Naturally, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart took advantage of this last night with a five-minute, satirical report on the "Benefits of Fracking." Of course, those benefits included the pizza coupons Chevron "awarded" to residents near the Dunkard, PA drilling explosion site earlier this year. Those type of gestures—along with the nosebleeds, dirty air and lack of clean water—surely must have led to Energy Makes America Great Executive Director Marita Noon telling Aasif Mandvi that fracking companies care and are "quite good at self-regulating or policing themselves."

Mandvi goes on to use a collage of news clips to chronicle a few "teeny, tiny snafus" like the fracking-related earthquakes, explosions and drilling accidents that have ravaged various areas of the country in recent years. Clearly, Stewart and Mandvi get it. We're not so sure about Noon.

 Check out the clip below:

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