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Join the Earth Month Plastic-Free Challenge

Looking for another way to reduce your carbon footprint or further travel the path of sustainability this Earth Month? Well consider the Earth Month Plastic-Free Challenge.

The goal of the Earth Month Plastic-Free Challenge is to increase awareness of and to avoid single-use products. The challenge is sponsored by EcoSuperhero, which showcases and uplifts positive universities, businesses, nonprofits and musicians who are making strides toward sustainability, and Earth Friendly Products, which offers more than 150 of the most effective plant-based green cleaners.

Earth Friendly Products and EcoSuperhero are challenging colleges and students, as well as their local communities, to eliminate single-use products—including plastic bags, utensils, straws, water bottles, paper towels and take-out containers—during the month of April.

Although we are half way through Earth Month, your 30-day challenge begins once the pledge is taken, so sign up any day of the month. EcoSuperhero and Earth Friendly Products suggest keeping a calendar of your success. Each week, those who accept the challenge will be automatically entered to win an Earth Friendly Products Safeguard Your Home Kit.

There are six simple steps to get you living a sustainable lifestyle on-the-go:

DAY  1–5

ACT: Refuse single-use plastic bags for 5 days in a row.

FACT: The average person uses 500 plastic bags per year, so by doing your part the planet will be a much healthier place to live.

DAY  6–10

ACT: Refuse single-use utensils for 5 days in a row. 

Remember to continue refusing all single-use plastic bags during these 5 days as well.

FACT: Millions of plastic forks, knives and spoons are used every single day, so by doing your part our oceans will be much cleaner.

DAY  11–15

ACT: Refuse single-use paper towels for 5 days in a row.

Remember to continue refusing all single-use plastic bags and utensils during these 5 days as well.

FACT: The average person uses 3,000 paper towels every year, which adds up to a huge impact on our landfills over time.

DAY  16–20

ACT: Refuse single-use plastic straws for 5 days in a row.

Remember to continue refusing all single-use plastic bags, utensils and paper towels during these 5 days as well.

FACT: The average person uses 550 plastic straws every year, which don’t get recycled and end up polluting our oceans and environment.

DAY  21–25

ACT: Refuse single-use plastic water bottles for 5 days in a row. 

Remember to continue refusing all single-use plastic bags, utensils, paper towels and plastic straws during these 5 days as well.

FACT: The average person uses 500 plastic water bottles every year, which use twice the amount of water to produce and end up breaking down into small tiny particles in our oceans where fish mistakenly eat it as food.

DAY  26–30

ACT: Refuse single-use take out and leftover containers for 5 days in a row.

Remember to continue refusing all single-use plastic bags, utensils, paper towels, plastic straws and plastic water bottles during these 5 days as well.

FACT: Millions of take out and leftover containers are used every day, which adds up to a huge environmental impact on our landfills over time.

The following higher education institutions have already taken the one-month pledge: UCLA, USC, UT Austin, Santa Monica City College, Marymount California, University of Utah, Dickinson University, University of Central Oklahoma and Loyola University Chicago.

Be part of the solution to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

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Beyond ‘Reduce, Reuse, Recycle’ to a World Without Waste

How to Teach Kids About Sustainability

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