Quantcast

Join Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution

Food

British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver will be launching his Food Revolution May 20. The global campaign aims to address the global health crisis by facilitating debate and inspiring positive change in the way children access, consume and understand food.

Oliver is looking to engage as many revolutionaries as possible to sign up and join the revolution to fix the broken food system. This campaign will be an ongoing effort to create lasting change to help the world feed the future. From May 20 onward, the new Food Revolution website will be uniting revolutionaries and showcasing food revolution events and stories from around the world.

Oliver's website explains that millions of children are eating too much of the wrong food while millions more don't get enough good food to grow and thrive. As a result, nearly 1 billion people in the world are hungry, while another 1 billion people are overweight or obese, according to the Worldwatch Institute. Solving this problem requires securing access to fresh, nutritious food for every eater on the planet.

In addition to signing up online to stay informed about the latest Food Revolution news, Oliver has laid out several steps for people to get involved:

Get cooking. Oliver is sharing 10 simple and nutritious recipes to encourage people to cook and learn essential culinary skills. He's inviting everyone to join him in cooking during a Facebook live event on May 20.

Get the kids involved. Parents and teachers should discuss these issues with kids to inspire them to appreciate food. Oliver has provided a special recipe and lesson plan for schools that's designed just for kids. There's also a collection of resources online for parents to get kids excited about food.

Show your support. Once you've joined the movement, invite your friends and family to do the same by sharing the campaign on social media or organizing offline events. You can use these materials to spread the word (but not for commercial use).

Become an ambassador. To take it a step further, join the team of volunteer food ambassadors who promote food access in their communities. You can apply here.

Lani Furbank is a writer and photographer based in the Washington, DC metro area, where she covers the intersection of food, farming and the environment for local and national publications. Follower her on Twitter @lanifurbank.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Jack Johnson Helps Connect Children to Their Land, Water and Food

Consumed: First Fictional Film to Cover Concerns of GMOs

Marion Nestle: 8 Books on Farming and Food That Deserve More Attention

Michael Pollan's 'Cooked': A Recipe for Change

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A worker in California sprays pesticides on strawberries, one of the crops on which chlorpyrifos is used. Paul Grebliunas / The Image Bank / Getty Images Plus

President Donald Trump's U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will not ban the agricultural use of chlorpyrifos, a toxic pesticide that the EPA's own scientists have linked to brain damage in children, The New York Times reported Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Conservationists estimate the orange-fronted parakeet population has likely doubled. Department of Conservation

Up until 25 years ago, New Zealand's orange-fronted parakeet, or kākāriki karaka, was believed to be extinct. Now, it's having one of its best breeding seasons in decades, NPR reported Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
Pexels

The world's population will hit 10 billion in just 30 years and all of those people need to eat. To feed that many humans with the resources Earth has, we will have to cut down the amount of beef we eat, according to a new report by the World Resources Institute.

Read More Show Less

Beachgoers enjoying a pleasant evening on Georgia's St. Simons Island rushed into the water, despite warnings of sharks, to rescue dozens of short-finned pilot whales that washed ashore on Tuesday evening, according to the New York Times.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

Six Extinction Rebellion protesters were arrested as they blocked off corporations in the UK. The group had increased their actions to week-long nationwide protests.

Read More Show Less
Sari Goodfriend

By Courtney Lindwall

Across the world, tens of thousands of young people are taking to the streets to protest climate inaction. And at the historic Apollo Theater in Harlem last month, more than a dozen of them took to the stage.

Read More Show Less
Pumpjacks on Lost Hills Oil Field in California. Arne Hückelheim, Wikimedia Commons

By Julia Conley

A national conservation group revealed Wednesday that President Donald Trump's drilling leases on public lands could lead to the release of more carbon emissions than the European Union contributes in an entire year.

Read More Show Less