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Join in Arbor Day Festivities With Holden Arboretum

Join in Arbor Day Festivities With Holden Arboretum

Arbor Day is the annual observance that celebrates the role of trees in our lives and promotes tree planting and care. Holden Arboretum will celebrate with a weekend filled with activities, as well as a scientist lecture and story times for children held at regional libraries.

Copyright 2002 The Holden Arboretum.

A range of family-friendly activities will take place at the 3,600 acre-arboretum in Kirtland, OH Friday, April 25 through Sunday, April 27, including a ceremonial tree planting, seedling give-aways, kids' crafts, walking tours, tree-themed lectures and more.

The Great Lakes Timber Show is returning for Arbor Day 2014. The show features chainsaw carving, axe throwing, wood chopping, one and two-man crosscut sawing, modified chain sawing, log rolling and loads of fun. Enjoy this fascinating display and learn more about the important role lumberjacks play in forest and tree management through selective harvesting.

The Great Lakes Timber Show log rolling. Photo credit: The Holden Arboretum.

Click here for a complete schedule of events.

In celebration of Arbor Day, admission to Holden is free all weekend.

About Arbor Day:

Arbor Day was founded by J. Sterling Morton in 1872. A newspaper editor and politician, Morton moved from Michigan to Nebraska and organized the first Arbor Day after he decided his new home needed more trees. It became an annual event in Nebraska two years later and quickly caught on around the country to achieve the universal level of celebration it enjoys today. As secretary of agriculture in Grover Cleveland’s second administration, Morton could advocate for trees with even greater reach. Morton stated “Other holidays repose upon the past; Arbor Day proposes for the future.” 

About The Holden Arboretum:

The Holden Arboretum is an outdoor living museum that promotes the beauty and importance of trees and other woody plants to create sustainable and healthy communities in the Great Lakes region and beyond.

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