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Join Hands in the Global Event against Offshore Drilling on Aug. 4

Energy
Join Hands in the Global Event against Offshore Drilling on Aug. 4

Surfrider Foundation and Hands Aross the Sand

The countdown has started. We will be joining hands around the globe on Saturday, Aug. 4 at Noon in your timezone. Thousands of people will join hands to say NO to filthy fuels and YES to clean energy sources.

Any person in the world can download tools to create their own event and join hands with their friends and neighbors. The event will begin in New Zealand and move across the world, ending in Hawaii.

We are joining hands for clean energy. We are joining hands to keep near and offshore oil drilling out of our waters. We are joining hands to end our dependence on the dirty fuels that foul our air, water and food.

Visit the Hands Across the Sand website to find events near you or to promote your own event.

Surfrider Foundation activists will be joining hands in support of Hands Across the Sand to raise awareness on “Three Essential Truths” about new offshore drilling:

1. It will not reduce the price at the pump.

2. It will not eliminate America’s reliance on foreign oil.

3. It is an inherently risky activity that causes significant impacts to the environment through every stage of the drilling process.

“The political discourse regarding offshore drilling continues to be heavy on rhetoric and light on facts. We challenge all elected officials to acknowledge these three essential truths when discussing any new offshore drilling proposals,” says Peter Stauffer, Surfrider Foundation’s ocean ecosystem manager. “We are confident that facing the facts about offshore drilling will show that offshore drilling is not the answer to our energy needs.”

Founded in 2009 by Dave Rauschkolb, Hands Across the Sand aims to steer America’s energy policy away from its dependence on offshore drilling and call for a new energy plan, which incorporates clean and renewable sources, and encourages conservation.

"Thank you for joining hands for clean energy," says Dave Rauschkolb. "We cannot afford to allow the major dirty fuel industries to continue to control our energy policies through political influence. We must join hands on so many levels beyond what will happen this year on the beaches and in towns and cities around the world. We must join hands and demand by whatever peaceful means our leaders steer a clear path of logic towards clean energy."

To find a local event or register to host one, visit www.handsacrossthesand.com.

Visit EcoWatch's ENERGY and RENEWABLES pages for more related news on these topics.

 

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