Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

John Oliver Slams Donald Trump for Unfathomable Comments on Nuclear Weapons

Politics

Just two days before the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, DC, where world leaders gather to reinforce a commitment to secure nuclear materials, "America's potential next president mentions that he'd be perfectly comfortable with other countries becoming nuclear powers, including Japan and South Korea," John Oliver said in his quick recap of the week on Last Week Tonight.

Oliver played a clip from CNN's town hall with Anderson Cooper where Donald Trump said, "We're better off if Japan protects itself against this maniac in North Korea. We're better of frankly if South Korea is going to start protecting it self."

Oliver responded by saying, “He says that with the confidence of a man who could easily find Saudi Arabia on a map if he was given three tries and the map only included countries ending with Arabia."

Oliver then played a clip of President Obama responding to Trump's nuclear comments.

Watch here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

World’s First Plastic Fishing Company Wants to Rid the Oceans of Plastic Pollution

Elon Musk Unveils Tesla Model 3: Accelerating Sustainable Transport Is ‘Important for the Future of the World’

Stanford Scientists Find Fracking Linked to Groundwater Contamination in Pavillion, Wyoming

This Must-See Documentary Shows the Future of Solar Power Is Here Today

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Trump introduces EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler during an event to announce changes to the National Environmental Policy Act, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Jan. 9, 2020 in Washington, DC. The changes would make it easier for federal agencies to approve infrastructure projects without considering climate change. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

A report scheduled for release later Tuesday by Congress' non-partisan Government Accountability Office (GAO) finds that the Trump administration undervalues the costs of the climate crisis in order to push deregulation and rollbacks of environmental protections, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
The American Federation of Teachers (AFT), National Education Association (NEA), and AASA, The School Superintendents Association, voiced support for safe reopening measures. www.vperemen.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA

By Kristen Fischer

It's going to be back-to-school time soon, but will children go into the classrooms?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) thinks so, but only as long as safety measures are in place.

Read More Show Less
Critics charge the legislation induces poor communities to sell off their water rights. Pexels

By Eoin Higgins

Over 300 groups on Monday urged Senate leadership to reject a bill currently under consideration that would incentivize communities to sell off their public water supplies to private companies for pennies on the dollar.

Read More Show Less
People enjoy outdoor dining along Pier Ave. in Hermosa Beach, California on July 8, 2020. Keith Birmingham / MediaNews Group / Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

California is reversing its reopening plans amidst a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

Read More Show Less
A protest against the name of the Washington Redskins in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Nov. 2, 2014. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

The Washington Redskins will retire their controversial name and logo, the National Football League (NFL) team announced Monday.

Read More Show Less
The survival tools northern fish have used for millennia could be a disadvantage as environmental conditions warm and more fast-paced species move in. Istvan Banyai / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Alyssa Murdoch, Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle and Sapna Sharma

Summer has finally arrived in the northern reaches of Canada and Alaska, liberating hundreds of thousands of northern stream fish from their wintering habitats.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A mother walks her children through a fountain on a warm summer day on July 12, 2020 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Gary Hershorn / Getty Images

A heat wave that set in over the South and Southwest left much of the U.S. blanketed in record-breaking triple digit temperatures over the weekend. The widespread and intense heat wave will last for weeks, making the magnitude and duration of its heat impressive, according to The Washington Post.

Read More Show Less