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James Franco's Poem on Climate Change: 'I Was Born Into a World'

Climate
James Franco's Poem on Climate Change: 'I Was Born Into a World'

As part of a series from the Guardian in which a handful of celebrities read poems on climate change, James Franco reads three poems—and one of them is his very own. "I Was Born into a World" details the changes that have occurred in Franco's lifetime on a planetary and societal level. "I’ve yet to read a book or watch a film about a future I’d like to live in," he laments.

Listen to Franco read his poem here (text is in the caption of his Instagram post below):

http://visuals.guim.co.uk/2015/11/climate-change-poems/1448008203082/assets/audio/James-Franco-reads-own-poem-I-Was-Born-Into-a-World---James-Franco.mp3

Check out my poem, "I was Born into a World" and other poems about climate change at the Guardian. I WAS BORN INTO A WORLD. I was born into a world Before recycling was a thing, Before oil wars, When the biggest world Threat was nuclear. The only extinct thing Was the Dodo, We consumed and junked. Then we were told about Droughts, and disappearing Rainforests. About melting ice caps, And we fought Iraq For a second time, Like father like son, We needed our oil Because we didn’t want Those electric cars. At one time there were Huge monsters that Walked where we walk, Nature swallowed them easy. Or maybe you believe It all started with Adam and Eve, But they too were kicked From the garden As are we, With our poison beaches Run down towns And our atmosphere That kills. I write a poem And preach to the converted. We send out loud messages To ourselves, That our world is dying: 1984, Blade Runner, Armageddon, The Road. I’ve yet to read a book, Or watch a film about a future I’d like to live in. Fortunately for me, I’ll die before the earth, But I’d like a place for my Computer chip self To click and beep In bright, clean happiness. Link in bio^^^^^^^ http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2015/nov/20/our-melting-shifting-liquid-world-celebrities-read-poems-on-climate-change

A photo posted by James Franco (@jamesfrancotv) on

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