Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

It's So Hot in LA That Even 'All-Weather' Fields Are Melting

Climate
It's So Hot in LA That Even 'All-Weather' Fields Are Melting

Extreme heat this summer has led to roads and shoes melting and now "all-weather" fields too. Five high schools with all-weather fields in Los Angeles are being forced to replace their fields because they keep melting. The turf is being replaced because of "defective materials," an LA district official told The Los Angeles Times, but California's record heat certainly has not helped.

Synthetic turf has become very popular in the last decade as a way to save money in water and maintenance costs, but installation costs can be very high—nearly $2 million, according to The Los Angeles Times. Not only are the installation costs high, but parents and school officials have also raised concerns about the health impacts of synthetic turf on children, including the risk of cancer. In response to these concerns, LA schools are phasing out materials from recycled tires on its turf fields.

The pellets used in this instance were a type of plastic known as TPE, which were supposed to withstand heat up to 180 degrees, but in tests had melted at 140 degrees. LA hasn't seen air temperatures get quite that high, but "synthetic fields absorb heat, resulting in surface temperatures much higher than measured in the surrounding air," explains The LA Times.

"Pellets were melting big time," said former football coach Jim McElroy at Diego Rivera high school. "It looked like a bunch of gum all over the place."

It's going to cost between $500,000 and $800,000 to replace the synthetic fields, for which the school district hopes to be reimbursed by the manufacturers. The school district told The LA Times it plans to continue to use the synthetic turf because "it has partners willing to share the cost and upkeep" and "more games can be played on synthetic fields than grass fields, which can be quickly worn out by weather and use."

It's not just LA, either. Record heat is scorching high school fields around the country. One Texas high school athlete's cleats (pictured in the Tweet above) melted during practice a few weeks ago in the Lone Star state. And people from around the country have been complaining on Twitter that it's so hot, they feel like their shoes are about to melt.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Devastating Wildfires Are Even Changing the Appearance of the Moon

Ocean Plastic Will Be Found in 99 Percent of Seabirds by 2050

Even Wall Street Asks: ‘Why Would You Not?’ Take Action on Climate Change

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists' "Doomsday Clock" — an estimate of how close humanity is to the apocalypse — remains at 100 seconds to zero for 2021. Eva Hambach / AFP / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

One hundred seconds to midnight. That's how close humanity is to the apocalypse, and it's as close as the world has ever been, according to Wednesday's annual announcement from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, a group that has been running its "Doomsday Clock" since the early years of the nuclear age in 1947.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The 13th North Atlantic right whale calf with their mother off Wassaw Island, Georgia on Jan. 19, 2010. @GeorgiaWild, under NOAA permit #20556

North Atlantic right whales are in serious trouble, but there is hope. A total of 14 new calves of the extremely endangered species have been spotted this winter between Florida and North Carolina.

Read More Show Less

Trending

There are new lifestyle "medicines" that are free that doctors could be prescribing for all their patients. Marko Geber / Getty Images

By Yoram Vodovotz and Michael Parkinson

The majority of Americans are stressed, sleep-deprived and overweight and suffer from largely preventable lifestyle diseases such as heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Being overweight or obese contributes to the 50% of adults who suffer high blood pressure, 10% with diabetes and additional 35% with pre-diabetes. And the costs are unaffordable and growing. About 90% of the nearly $4 trillion Americans spend annually for health care in the U.S. is for chronic diseases and mental health conditions. But there are new lifestyle "medicines" that are free that doctors could be prescribing for all their patients.

Read More Show Less
Candles spell out, "Fight for 1 point 5" in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany on Dec. 11, 2020, in reference to 1.5°C of Earth's warming. The event was organized by the Fridays for Future climate movement. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Taking an unconventional approach to conduct the largest-ever poll on climate change, the United Nations' Development Program and the University of Oxford surveyed 1.2 million people across 50 countries from October to December of 2020 through ads distributed in mobile gaming apps.

Read More Show Less
A monarch butterfly is perched next to an adult caterpillar on a milkweed plant, the only plant the monarch will lay eggs on and the caterpillar will eat. Cathy Keifer / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

Fall used to be the time when millions of monarch butterflies in North America would journey upwards of 2,000 miles to warmer winter habitat.

Read More Show Less