Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

It's Official: Jon and Tracey Stewart Convert 12-Acre Farm to Animal Sanctuary

It's Official: Jon and Tracey Stewart Convert 12-Acre Farm to Animal Sanctuary

The rumors are true. Jon Stewart and his wife Tracey are turning their 12-acre farm in Middelton, New Jersey into an animal sanctuary affiliated with Farm Sanctuary. The organization has been working for the last three decades to end inhumane farm practices and create better lives for animals. Tracey revealed the news on Saturday night at Farm Sanctuary's annual gala at the Plaza Hotel in New York City.

"We bought a farm in New Jersey, with the intention of starting a farm sanctuary of our own," she said at the gala, where she and Jon were honored with an award. "We're getting married. Farm Sanctuary and us, we're getting married."

It will be the fourth such Farm Sanctuary site with the original in upstate New York and two in California, according to Farm Sanctuary's website.

The Stewart's farm is called Bufflehead, and it's currently home to four rescue pigs. Future inhabitants, the New York Times reports, will likely include more pigs, as well as cows, sheep, goats, chickens and turkeys.

Tracey, a longtime animal advocate and vegan, is the editor-in-chief of the online parenting magazine Moomah. Her new book is called Do Unto Animals, a humorous and insightful look into the secret lives of animals and a guide for how to live alongside them. A portion of the proceeds will go to Farm Sanctuary.

Fans of The Daily Show know that Jon was a consistent animal advocate throughout his time on the air. Most notably, he skewered Gov. Christie on vetoing a popular gestation crate ban. He also hosted Gene Baur of Farm Sanctuary to discuss animal rescue and veganism and John Hargrove, the former SeaWorld employee who became a whistleblower on the company’s animal cruelty.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

12 Nontoxic Nail Polish Brands

4 Solar Powered Homes Designed by Students That Will Blow You Away

A sea turtle rescued from Israel's devastating oil spill. MENAHEM KAHANA / AFP via Getty Images

Rescue workers in Israel are using a surprising cure to save the sea turtles harmed by a devastating oil spill: mayonnaise!

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A "digital twin of Earth." European Space Agency

As the weather grows more severe, and its damages more expensive and fatal, current weather predictions fall short in providing reliable information on Earth's rapidly changing systems.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Melting ice in places such as Greenland could stop a critical ocean current. Paul Souders / Getty Images

The climate crisis could push an important ocean current past a critical tipping point sooner than expected, new research suggests.

Read More Show Less
California Gov. Gavin Newsom tours the Chevron oil field west of Bakersfield, where a spill of more than 900,000 gallons flowed into a dry creek bed, on July 24, 2019. Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Accusing California regulators of "reckless disregard" for public "health and safety," the environmental advocacy group Center for Biological Diversity on Wednesday sued the administration of Gov. Gavin Newsom for approving thousands of oil and gas drilling and fracking projects without the required environmental review.

Read More Show Less
Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and Kenyan professor Wangari Maathai poses during the COP15 UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark on December 15, 2009. Olivier Morin / AFP / Getty Images

By Kate Whiting

From Greta Thunberg to Sir David Attenborough, the headline-grabbing climate change activists and environmentalists of today are predominantly white. But like many areas of society, those whose voices are heard most often are not necessarily representative of the whole.

Read More Show Less