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Iraqi Waterkeeper Film Aims to Educate Children and Communities

Iraqi Upper Tigris Waterkeeper

The Quilisan and Tanjero rivers near the city of Sulaymaniyah, Kurdistan, in northern Iraq—once large, vibrant and healthy rivers—are now nearly dead from pollution and degradation. To create awareness of the polluted rivers, the Waterkeeper team showed their film about the river spirit to hundreds of children and students in and around Sulaymaniyah.

The 28 minute movie is part of an environmental arts project by Julius Richard, Zoilo Lobera and Nabil Musa. Through the use of film puppetry, masks and the applied drama tools, they engaged with the community in an attempt to highlight their relationship with the environment.

"We really hope we can spread the message all around, especially here in Kurdistan where the film was created, but also beyond," said Lobera on his last day in Kurdistan. "However, the Waterkeeper team will continue to do workshops for communities living close to the river."

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