Quantcast

Interactive Map: Find Out How Your State Ranks on Renewable Energy

Business

What states are moving ahead on clean energy and what states are lagging behind? A new interactive map released by Earthjustice lets you see at a glance.

This map lets you find out where any state stands on clean energy. Image credit: Earthjustice

The map is part of an Earthjustice report Coming Clean: The State of U.S. Renewable Energy. It lets you locate your state alphabetically by name or find the states that fall in each category: "Spotlighting Green," "Too Close to Call," and "Lagging Behind."

You can also filter for solar/wind energy sources, states with goals stronger or weaker than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 2030 goal  for that state under President Obama's Clean Power Plan, states where Earthjustice has been involved and how, and states where attacks on clean energy goals are taking place. The map shows that finalizing the Clean Power Plan, which sets different goals for each state to reduce carbon emissions by 2030, will be essential to moving forward in states that have so far been reluctant or hostile to investing in clean energy.

The report also provides more detailed information on each state including its top three energy sources, its own renewable goal and how close it is to meeting the EPA goal, whether its goal is voluntary or mandatory, and where a state is excelling and where it needs to do more work as far as its current policies on renewable energy.

“The Clean Power Plan proposes first-ever limits on carbon pollution from the biggest contributors to climate change: dirty coal plants,” said Earthjustice vice president of litigation for climate & energy Abigail Dillen. “With the comment period for the plan ending the first of December, we need to support these limits, while also demanding a more ambitious final rule that reflects the role that renewable energy can and must play in tackling climate change.”

Among the standouts whose own renewable energy goals for 2030 exceed the EPA's are California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York and Oregon. Hawaii, while heavily oil and coal dependent now, with just 4 percent of its energy coming from its top renewable, wind, stands out for its ambitious goal of reducing emissions by 40 percent by 2030, compared to the EPA's goal of 1 percent for the state. It's making great strides in solar energy, placing it 6th in the country with one in nine homes now having installed solar power generation.

At the other end of the spectrum are heavily coal-dependent states that have formulated no emissions-reduction goals—including Kentucky, Nebraska and Wyoming. The saddest case is that of Ohio where, Earthjustice notes, the state set a goal of a 12 percent reduction, a percentage point higher than the EPA goal—but there's an asterisk: "As of 2014, Ohio's Renewable Portfolio Standard has been frozen due to political interference."

It explains, "The Buckeye State has become a battleground where the fossil fuel industry has been spreading false information and flawed analysis claiming renewable energy sources are more expensive than fossil fuels. The state was on track for a clean energy future but was derailed in 2014 by a bill that halts Ohio's renewable energy standards for two years. Unfortunately, Ohio has also joined 11 other states in suing the EPA to block the Clean Power Plan."

And it warns, "Unfortunately, Ohio has also joined 11 other states in suing the EPA to block the Clean Power Plan."

The interactive map will tell you whether your state is among them.

The map is part of a four-part Earthjustice web series on the Clean Power Plan that focuses on climate change as a human rights issue, how the plan works and how it can go further to safeguard communities, where each state stands on the road to a clean energy country, and why social justice and public health leaders are hopeful for the future.

 YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

5 Things You Need to Know About Obama’s Clean Power Plant Rule

McKibben to Obama: Fracking May Be Worse Than Burning Coal

Ohio Gov. John Kasich Signs Nation's First Renewable Energy Freeze

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Stuart Braun

A year after activist Greta Thunberg first stood in the rain outside the Swedish parliament with her now iconic "Skolstrejk för klimatet" — school strike for the climate — placard, the movement she spawned has set the tone for environmental protest action around the world.

Read More Show Less
Bruno Vincent / Staff / Getty Images

Toy maker Hasbro wants to play in the eco-packaging game. The board game giant will ditch its plastic packaging by 2022. The move means that games like Monopoly, Scrabble and Operation will no longer have shrink wrap, window sheets, plastic bags or elastic bands, as the Associated Press reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Vaping impaired the circulatory systems of people in a new study. bulentumut / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Vaping one time — even without nicotine — can damage blood vessels, reduce blood flow and create dangerous toxins, according to a new study published in the journal Radiology.

Read More Show Less
A man spreads pesticides on a plantation of vegetables in Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Ze Martinusso / Moment Open / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Pointing to the deaths of more than half a billion bees in Brazil over a period of just four months, beekeepers, experts and activists are raising concerns about the soaring number of new pesticides greenlighted for use by the Brazilian government since far-right President Jair Bolsonaro took office in January — and the threat that it poses to pollinators, people and the planet.

Read More Show Less
SHEALAH CRAIGHEAD

By Elliott Negin

On July 19, President Trump hosted Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins and their families, along with the family of their deceased colleague Neil Armstrong, at a White House event to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first manned landing on the moon.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The study looked at three groups of diverse lizards from South America. Daniel Pincheira-Donoso
  1. Cold-climate lizards that give live birth to their offspring are more likely to be driven to extinction than their egg-laying cousins as global temperatures continue to rise, new research suggests.
Read More Show Less
Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Denmark isn't interested in selling Greenland to the U.S., so now President Trump doesn't want to visit.

Read More Show Less
A stock photo of fire in the Amazon; a record number of fires have burned there this year. Brasil2 / E+ / Getty Images

There are a record number of wildfires burning in the Amazon rainforest, Brazil's space agency has said. Their smoke is visible from space and shrouded the city of São Paulo in darkness for about an hour Monday afternoon, CBS news reported.

Read More Show Less