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Innovation and Green Jobs Highlighted at California Academy of Sciences Tour

Energy

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

On Wednesday, Nov. 2, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson will visit the Bay Area and tour the 158-year-old California Academy of Sciences, the world’s largest public Double Platinum LEED-rated building. The tour will highlight the role of science and innovation in green job development. With a living roof that transforms carbon dioxide into oxygen, captures rainwater and reduces energy needs for heating and cooling, the state-of-the art museum also features a four-story rainforest bio-dome that is home to flora and fauna from Borneo, Costa Rica, Madagascar and the Amazon Basin.

During the tour, Jackson will participate in a discussion with senior staff about innovative education and outreach programs. She will also meet with researchers in fields ranging from marine biology to botany and biodiversity.

Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011
2:30—3:30 p.m. Tour of California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, Calif.

RSVP: To participate please RSVP in advance with name, contact info (include email and phone) and media affiliation to Mary Simms at simms.mary@epa.gov ASAP.

For more information, click here.

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