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Indigenous Leaders Disrupt Auction Persuading Companies From Acquiring Fracking Blocks in Brazil

Energy

Yesterday, indigenous leaders and activists against fracking interrupted the auction of oil and gas exploration blocks organized by the Brazilian Agency of Oil and Gas to talk about climate change, indigenous rights, divestment and climate justice. Their intervention was followed by unionized oil workers who also spoke against the auction, which was described as a failure by local media, as only 37 out of the 266 blocks being auctioned were sold.

Indigenous leaders and activists against fracking interrupted the auction of oil and gas exploration blocks organized by the Brazilian Agency of Oil and Gas. Photo credit: Oriana Eliçabe / Paulo Lima / 350.org

Later in the day, a press conference was organized where nine indigenous chiefs and nine indigenous leaders spoke against fracking and shared their experience with oil exploration in the Amazon and Paraná regions.

On Oct. 4, COESUS—Coalizão Não Fracking Brazil (No-Fracking Brazil Coalition)—supported by 350.org, called for a day of action in solidarity with the Brazilian fight against fracking. A total of 23 countries, with three cities in the UK and 39 Brazilian cities joined in saying no to fracking.

A press conference was organized where nine indigenous chiefs and nine indigenous leaders spoke against fracking. Photo credit: Oriana Eliçabe / Paulo Lima / 350.org

Since 2015, the work of the coalition has taken significant steps to keep fracking from taking place in Brazil. Their lobby was key to get the law project for a five-year moratorium on fracking to pass at the Environment Commission of the Federal Parliament. Local ban law projects have also been submitted for voting in 25 municipalities and one state.

“The most important thing we have done is to be able to inform and mobilize communities in isolated areas against fracking,” pointed Nicole Figueiredo de Oliveira, 350.org Brazil team leader and a part of the Coalizão Não Fracking Brazil. “Now there are eight indigenous groups taking part in this campaign with us. We will continue working to keep fracking away from their lands and from the precious forests and water resources of our country,” Oliveira concluded.

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