Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Mumbai Becomes Largest City in India to Ban Single-Use Plastics

Popular
Plastic bags that will be washed, dried and then recycled in India. World Resources Institute / Flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

The Indian state of Maharashtra—which encompasses the fast-paced and densely populated city capital of Mumbai—imposed a statewide ban on single-use plastics over the weekend.

The protocol, first introduced on March 23, prohibits the manufacturing, use, sale, distribution and storage of materials such as plastic grocery bags, cutlery, plates, PET and PETE bottles and foam takeaway containers. The state government gave establishments three months to dispose of existing stocks.


Repeat offenders can face a maximum punishment of up to Rs. 25,000 ($367) and three months in jail.

Aditya Thackeray, the leader of the Shiv Sena party who was key in pushing the ban through, called the new policy a "historic step" in protecting the environment.

Maharashtra is now the 18th state in the country to enforce a plastic ban. NDTV reported that the state generates 1,200 metric tons of plastic waste every day, with Mumbai alone generating 500 metric tons daily, or roughly 10 percent of its total waste.

Much of this plastic ends up clogging drains and leaching out to sea, causing major marine pollution around Mumbai, NDTV noted.

However, the new rule is taking some adjustment. The Times of India reported that citizens and vendors are willing to adapt to the ban, but are finding a lack of affordable alternatives. Some city inspectors have also been confused by the specifications of the ban and are fining permitted items.

Plastic pollution is a major problem in India, which generates about 25,000 metric tons of plastic waste every year and only recycles 60 percent of it. For that reason, the country has taken steps to beat plastic pollution on a national and regional level.

Earlier this month, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced plans to eliminate all single-use plastics by 2022.

According to a UN plastics report, regional bans have had various degrees of success. Of the 10 regional bans listed in the report, two bans, in the states of Himachal Pradesh and Sikkim, have seen significant to moderate results, while four bans, including one in New Delhi, have had little to no impact, and four could not be assessed due to limited data.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

U.S. President Donald Trump listens as Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks in the Rose Garden for the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on March 29 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Just over a month after proclaiming that the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. would soon "be down to close to zero," President Donald Trump said during a press briefing on the White House lawn Sunday that limiting U.S. deaths from the pandemic to between 100,000 and 200,000 people would mean his administration and the country as a whole did "a very good job."

Read More Show Less
Dicamba is having a devastating impact in Arkansas and neighboring states. A farmer in Mississippi County, Arkansas looks at rows of soybean plants affected by dicamba. The Washington Post / Getty Images

Documents unearthed in a lawsuit brought by a Missouri farmer who claimed that Monsanto and German chemical maker BASF's dicamba herbicide ruined his peach orchard revealed that the two companies knew their new agricultural seed and chemical system would likely damage many U.S. farms, according to documents seen by The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Washington State Governor Jay Inslee and other leaders speak to the press on March 28, 2020 in Seattle. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Washington State has seen a slowdown in the infection rate of the novel coronavirus, for now, suggesting that early containment strategies have been effective, according to the Seattle NBC News affiliate.

Read More Show Less
A bushfire burns outside the Perth Cricket Stadium in Perth, Australia on Dec. 13, 2019. PETER PARKS / AFP via Getty Images

By Albert Van Dijk, Luigi Renzullo, Marta Yebra and Shoshana Rapley

2019 was the year Australians confronted the fact that a healthy environment is more than just a pretty waterfall in a national park; a nice extra we can do without. We do not survive without air to breathe, water to drink, soil to grow food and weather we can cope with.

Read More Show Less

By Fino Menezes

Everyone adores dolphins. Intelligent, inquisitive and playful, these special creatures have captivated humans since the dawn of time. But dolphins didn't get to where they are by accident — they needed to develop some pretty amazing superpowers to cope with their environment.

Read More Show Less