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Imagine There’s No Fracking … Give Clean Energy a Chance

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Imagine There’s No Fracking … Give Clean Energy a Chance

Artists Against Fracking

Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon placed a full-page ad in the Dec. 10 New York Times, calling on Governor Cuomo to “Imagine There’s No Fracking … give clean energy a chance.” The ad illustrates and describes how cement in wells at such great depths leaks, poisoning drinking water with gases and toxic chemicals.

“No amount of regulation can ever make fracking safe,” the ad reads. “No one can be sent thousands of feet under the Earth to make repairs once the cement fails—and it will. The enormous pressure and temperature changes at those depths guarantee it.”

The ad continues, “Fracked gas is not climate friendly. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas that leaks from the failed wells, fractured rock and pipelines … New York can become the Clean Energy Empire State. With an economy bolstered by insulating all buildings. This way we could save far more energy and create FAR more jobs than fracking, plus save consumers money forever. And let’s scale up solar and wind power with a smart grid for truly clean, economical energy.”

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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