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illUmiNations: Exposing the Cause Behind the Extinction of Species

Climate
illUmiNations: Exposing the Cause Behind the Extinction of Species

New York City was certainly the place to be over the last week. There were so many events, it was impossible to attend everything. But one event I'm glad I didn't miss was the 11-minute unprecedented visual event of lighting up the United Nations headquarters—the day before the People's Climate March and two days before the UN Climate Summit—in a "revolutionary call to action for citizens of the world to demand action from their leaders to protect the world’s ecosystems."

The United Nations Department of Public Information, Oceanic Preservation Society founded by photographer and Academy Award-winning director Louie Psihoyos, Obscura Digital, producer Fisher Stevens and musical score composer J. Ralph collaborated to create this spectacular program.

“Scientists predict we will lose half of all our species on the planet by the end of this century," said Psihoyos. "We wanted to create a spectacular program that would showcase how fast we’re losing species and why their numbers are declining. We hope illUmiNations will bring well-needed attention to the plight of these animals and our role in their decline.”

illUmiNations will be the culminating moment in Oceanic Preservation Society’s latest film, RACING EXTINCTION, which takes a candid look at the current state of the planet’s health, exposing the causes behind the rapidly increasing rate of extinction among animal and plant species.

"Our generation must illuminate and take action around truth for the sake of future generations. It is imperative that we at a personal level and we at a governmental level stand and change together," said Travis Threlkel, founder and chief creative officer at Obscura Digital.

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