Quantcast
Popular
Illinois Sierra Club / Twitter

Illinois Legislators to Trump: We Will Not Roll Back Historic Environmental Laws

Illinois state legislators announced Friday a series of legislative proposals that would block any weakened environmental and worker protection standards from taking effect in Illinois, and also respond to President Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris agreement.


House Bill 1438 and Senate Bill 2212, introduced by chief sponsors Rep. Juliana Stratton and Sen. Daniel Biss, would maintain existing environmental and worker safeguards in Illinois, even if they are weakened at the federal level.

President Trump, his administration and leaders in Congress have signaled their intent to roll back federal environmental and labor protections, which in many cases would authorize Illinois to weaken its own standards.

"Donald Trump is beginning a race to the bottom by dismantling the EPA and rolling back protections for our air, water and natural resources," said Jack Darin, director of Sierra Club Illinois Chapter. "Illinois does not have to follow Trump backward when it comes to the health and safety of our environment and our workers."

HB 1438/SB 2212 would bar Illinois agencies from following the federal government in lowering standards required by these federal laws: Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Endangered Species Act, Occupational Safety and Health Act, Mine Safety and Health Act and Federal Labor Standards Act.

"With the Trump administration's unfortunate announcement of the United States' withdrawal from the Paris accord, it is now up to states and localities to keep fighting for environmental justice," said Rep. Juliana Stratton (D-Chicago). "I am proud to be the chief sponsor of House Bill 1438 because we all have a part in acting on climate change to protect future generations."

Sen. Daniel Biss (D-Evanston) agrees. "It's time for Illinois to set a goal of 100 percent clean energy for our state," he said. "Just because the Trump administration has declared it will lodge its head firmly in the sand and ignore the need for realistic environmental policy doesn't mean we can't act. These efforts put us on track to comply with the Paris climate agreement here in Illinois. I hope it serves as an example to other states as Illinois begins to chart a path to a 100 percent clean energy future."

Green Caucus Chair Rep. Robyn Gabel plans to introduce a joint resolution calling on Gov. Rauner to support the Paris agreement by joining governors across the country in the U.S. Climate Alliance, and to deliver a state power plan to put Illinois on a path towards 100 percent clean energy.

"Trump's plan to pull out of the Paris climate agreement is irresponsible and reprehensible," said Rep. Robyn Gabel (D-Evanston), chair of the Illinois Legislative Green Caucus. "The Paris agreement was a major milestone in the fight to combat climate change—but we also knew even at the time that it was merely a first step—and that there would be much more work to do for the U.S. and governments around the world. We call on Gov. Rauner to condemn this decision and step forward to do everything possible to protect our water, land and the air we breathe."

Sen. Heather Steans (D-Chicago) announced plans to introduce legislation establishing a goal of 100 percent clean energy for Illinois to assert state leadership on climate change.

"President Trump made an egregious error when he decided to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris agreement," said Steans. "To combat this decision and ensure that Illinois continues to reduce greenhouse gases, I am working on legislation to move Illinois toward 100 percent clean energy and a bill to increase the use of electric vehicles. I will continue to push Illinois to be an environmental leader."

Show Comments ()

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Sponsored
Health
Pexels

5 Ingredients for Health: Starting with Food

On Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg, Dr. Robert Graham—board-certified physician and founder of FRESHMed NYC—combines mainstream medical practices with therapies inspired by ancient wisdom: an integrative model of medicine. "My dad was a biochemist, so I grew up in this integrative model. One of the things that really stood out is my mom was distrustful about the conventional Western model. She still thinks she's the only doctor in the house, because food is such a powerful medicine, especially from her culture," said Graham.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Malte Mueller / Getty Images

When Profit Drives Us, Community Suffers

By David Korten

As I was reading the current series of YES! articles on the mental health crisis, I received an email from Darcia Narvaez, professor of psychology at University of Notre Dame. She was sending me articles being prepared for an anthology she is co-editing with the working title Sustainable Vision.The articles present lessons from indigenous culture that underscore why community is the solution to so much of what currently ails humanity.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
The Revelator

Interactive Map: Air Pollution in 2100

By Dipika Kadaba

Having a little trouble breathing lately? That's no surprise. Air pollution is already bad in many parts of the country, and climate change is only going to make it worse. Even though many industries are reducing their emissions, a warming climate could actually offset these reductions by intensifying the rates of chemical reactions and accumulation of pollutants in the environment.

Keep reading... Show less
Health
ddukang / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Is Apple Cider Vinegar Good for You? A Doctor Weighs In

By Gabriel Neal

When my brother and I were kids back in the '80s, we loved going to Long John Silver's.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Animals

Dumpster Debacle Distracts From Serious Spike in Whale Deaths

This week, a video of a failed attempt to put a dead, 4,000-pound whale into a tiny dumpster made the rounds on the internet, garnering chuckles and comparisons to Peter Griffin forklifting and impaling a beached sperm whale on Family Guy.

The juvenile minke whale washed up on Jenness Beach in Rye, New Hampshire on Monday morning, NBC 10 Boston reported. It was found with entanglement wounds, so researchers with the Seacoast Science Center and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) wanted to move the carcass from the beach to a lab for a necropsy to study its death.

Keep reading... Show less
Adventure
Muir Woods, which costs $10 for entry, will have free entry on Sept. 22. m01229 / Flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

Visit Any National Park for Free This Saturday to Celebrate 25th National Public Lands Day

If you're stuck for plans this weekend, we suggest escaping your city or town for the great outdoors.

This Saturday marks the 25th National Public Lands Day, organized by the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF).

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Climate
A glacier flows towards East Antarctica. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / CC BY 2.0

Temperatures Possible This Century Could Melt Parts of East Antarctic Ice Sheet, Raise Sea Levels 10+ Feet

A section of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet that contains three to four meters (approximately 10 to 13 feet) of potential sea level rise could melt if temperatures rise to just two degrees above pre-industrial levels, a study published in Nature Wednesday found.

Researchers at Imperial College London, the University of Queensland, and other institutions in New Zealand, Japan and Spain looked at marine sediments to assess the behavior of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin during warmer periods of the Pleistocene and found evidence of melting when temperatures in Antarctica were at least two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels for periods of 2,500 years or more.

Keep reading... Show less
Energy
Oil well in North Dakota. Tim Evanson / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Pipeline Leaks 63,840 Gallons of Produced Water in North Dakota

A pipeline released 63,840 gallons (1,520 barrels) of produced water that contaminated rangeland in Dunn County, North Dakota, the Bismarck Tribune reported, citing officials with the North Dakota Department of Health.

Produced water is a byproduct of oil and gas extraction, and can contain drilling chemicals if fracking was used.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!