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IKEA: Going 100% Renewable by 2020 Makes Good Business Sense

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IKEA: Going 100% Renewable by 2020 Makes Good Business Sense

IKEA has proven that going green is how you make the green with sales exceeding $1 billion in 2014. The company has pledged to go 100 percent renewable by 2020, and this past summer they committed $1.13 billion to fight climate change and invest in renewable energy.

"We've made the commitment that by 2020 we'll be a net exporter of energy," say Joanna Yarrow, head of Sustainability in the UK and Ireland for IKEA. "Becoming 100 percent renewable is gearing ourselves up to be a successful business in the future.”

Watch Yarrow explain why going 100 percent renewable by 2020 makes good business sense:

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