Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

IKEA Continues to Lead in Solar Energy Installations

Business
IKEA Continues to Lead in Solar Energy Installations

IKEA has commenced work on a new solar panel array that will double the amount of generation at a store just outside, Boston, MA.

The retailer, which installed solar projects on 39 of its 44 U.S. locations last year, recently began work on a 58,575-square-foot addition to its Stoughton, MA location. The addition will make space for 1,248 panels to be installed next spring and produce 383,200 kilowatt hours (kWh) per year.

IKEA will add 1,248 solar panels to a location just outside Boston. Photo credit: IKEA

“We are thrilled at the opportunity to double the amount of solar energy generated and used by this store,” Anton van Dongen, store manager, said in a statement. “This is another example of the IKEA commitment to create a more sustainable life for communities where we operate.” 

Once the project is completed, the Stoughton site will have a total of 5,468 panels that generate 1,078,200 kWh. Using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator, IKEA estimates that total to be the equivalent of reducing 761 tons of carbon dioxide, eliminating the emissions of 158 cars or powering 105 homes.

Nearly 90 percent of IKEA's stores are powered by solar energy.

IKEA allocated $1.8 billion to invest in renewable energy through 2015. The company aims to use 100 percent clean energy by 2020. The Swedish company has installed more than 300,000 solar panels on buildings across the world and owns and operates 137 wind turbines in Europe.

IKEA's other sustainable efforts include recycling waste material using energy-efficient HVAC and lighting systems, recycling construction materials, using skylights in warehouses and conserving water in its restrooms. Last month, the company announced that it would take on the largest geothermal project in the history of Kansas and Missouri to heat and cool its Merriam store, just outside Kansas City.

A replica of a titanosaur. AIZAR RALDES / AFP via Getty Images

New fossils uncovered in Argentina may belong to one of the largest animals to have walked on Earth.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Trump's Affordable Clean Energy rule eliminated a provision mandating that utilities move away from coal. VisionsofAmerica /Joe Sohm / Getty Images

A federal court on Tuesday struck down the Trump administration's rollback of the Obama-era Clean Power Plan regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A wild mink in Utah was the first wild animal in the U.S. found with COVID-19. Peter Trimming via Wikipedia, CC BY-SA

By Jonathan Runstadler and Kaitlin Sawatzki

Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have found coronavirus infections in pet cats and dogs and in multiple zoo animals, including big cats and gorillas. These infections have even happened when staff were using personal protective equipment.

Read More Show Less
A mass methane release could begin an irreversible path to full land-ice melt. NurPhoto / Contributor / Getty Images

By Peter Giger

The speed and scale of the response to COVID-19 by governments, businesses and individuals seems to provide hope that we can react to the climate change crisis in a similarly decisive manner - but history tells us that humans do not react to slow-moving and distant threats.

Read More Show Less
Doug Emhoff, U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, Jill Biden and President-elect Joe Biden wave as they arrive on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol for the inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By John R. Platt

The period of the 45th presidency will go down as dark days for the United States — not just for the violent insurgency and impeachment that capped off Donald Trump's four years in office, but for every regressive action that came before.

Read More Show Less