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Iconic 'Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas' Sign Now Powered by Solar

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Iconic 'Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas' Sign Now Powered by Solar

Regardless if whatever happens in Las Vegas actually stays there, visitors are now welcomed by renewable energy.

The flashy, landmark "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas” sign began using solar power on Wednesday, The Associated Press reported. Solar panels on 25-foot towers have been linked to the 55-year-old neon sign that welcomes people to one of the world's most popular tourist destinations.

Elected officials and project leaders flip the switch of the "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas" sign to renewable energy. Photo credit: Clean Energy Project

Nevada-based nonprofits Green Chips and Clean Energy Project (CEP) led the push for a renewable sign. The Consumer Electronics Association, utility NV Energy, the Las Vegas Centennial Commission and Bombard Renewable Energy collaborated on the funding.

"When we embarked on this project over a year ago, our mission was to highlight the power of clean energy and encourage even more clean energy development in our state," CEP wrote in a blog post.

"Converting this iconic sign's power source to solar is putting a stake in the ground, letting people everywhere know that it is possible to use our natural resources to power our existing economy!"

 Three free-standing "solar trees" were installed just south of the sign. The city hopes the deployment of solar energy serves as an example to area residents and tourists. Las Vegas already boasts more LEED-certified green building space per capita than any other state in the country, according to CEP.

"Due to our commitment, strong community support and policies pursued over the past decade, Nevada has seen significant growth and benefits to the state in the clean energy sector," CEP wrote. "But we have only just begun!"

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

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