Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Iconic 'Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas' Sign Now Powered by Solar

Business
Iconic 'Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas' Sign Now Powered by Solar

Regardless if whatever happens in Las Vegas actually stays there, visitors are now welcomed by renewable energy.

The flashy, landmark "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas” sign began using solar power on Wednesday, The Associated Press reported. Solar panels on 25-foot towers have been linked to the 55-year-old neon sign that welcomes people to one of the world's most popular tourist destinations.

Elected officials and project leaders flip the switch of the "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas" sign to renewable energy. Photo credit: Clean Energy Project

Nevada-based nonprofits Green Chips and Clean Energy Project (CEP) led the push for a renewable sign. The Consumer Electronics Association, utility NV Energy, the Las Vegas Centennial Commission and Bombard Renewable Energy collaborated on the funding.

"When we embarked on this project over a year ago, our mission was to highlight the power of clean energy and encourage even more clean energy development in our state," CEP wrote in a blog post.

"Converting this iconic sign's power source to solar is putting a stake in the ground, letting people everywhere know that it is possible to use our natural resources to power our existing economy!"

 Three free-standing "solar trees" were installed just south of the sign. The city hopes the deployment of solar energy serves as an example to area residents and tourists. Las Vegas already boasts more LEED-certified green building space per capita than any other state in the country, according to CEP.

"Due to our commitment, strong community support and policies pursued over the past decade, Nevada has seen significant growth and benefits to the state in the clean energy sector," CEP wrote. "But we have only just begun!"

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The wildfires that roared through Eastern Washington in September had a devastating impact on an extremely endangered species of rabbit.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protestor in NYC holds up a sign that reads, "November Is Coming" on June 14, 2020 in reference to voting in the 2020 presidential election. Ira L. Black / Corbis / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard

What follows are not candidate endorsements. Rather, this nonpartisan guide aims to inform voters' choices, help journalists decide what races to follow, and explore what the 2020 elections could portend for climate action in the United States in 2021 and beyond.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Activists fight a peat fire in Siberia in September. ALEXANDER NEMENOV / AFP via Getty Images

The wildfires that ignited in the Arctic this year started earlier and emitted more carbon dioxide than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A metapopulation project in South Africa has almost doubled the population of cheetahs in less than nine years. Ken Blum / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Tony Carnie

South Africa is home to around 1,300 of the world's roughly 7,100 remaining cheetahs. It's also the only country in the world with significant cheetah population growth, thanks largely to a nongovernmental conservation project that depends on careful and intensive human management of small, fenced-in cheetah populations. Because most of the reserves are privately funded and properly fenced, the animals benefit from higher levels of security than in the increasingly thinly funded state reserves.

Read More Show Less
A new super enzyme feeds on the type of plastic that water and soda bottles are made of, polyethylene terephthalate (PET). zoff-photo / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Scientists are on the brink of scaling up an enzyme that devours plastic. In the latest breakthrough, the enzyme degraded plastic bottles six times faster than previous research achieved, as The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch