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Hurricane Maria's Legacy: One Year Later

Climate
Hurricane Maria's Legacy: One Year Later
A child rides his bicycle in an area affected by the Hurricane Maria passing in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico on Oct. 5, 2017. RICARDO ARDUENGO / AFP / Getty Images

As Puerto Rico marked one year since Hurricane Maria made landfall yesterday, the Miami Herald this week ran extensive reports in English and Spanish on the island's continuing recovery.


Nine stories on healthcare, housing, education and energy document how the storm has changed Puerto Rico and how residents are still struggling to return to normal.

A tenth story on FEMA's contracts with inexperienced bidders and a column on Trump illustrate the inadequacy of U.S. response. "Imagine if the entire state of Connecticut had been totally razed by a natural disaster," Puerto Rico Health Secretary Rafael Rodríguez told the Miami Herald. "That's the magnitude of what happened in Puerto Rico, and a lot of people don't recognize that."

For a deeper dive:

Housing: Miami Herald on overall recovery & rejected FEMA claims

Energy: Miami Herald on the grid & solar use

Education: Miami Herald on special education & neighborhood schools

Healthcare: Miami Herald on healthcare infrastructure, elderly care & mental health

U.S. response: Miami Herald

Commentary: Miami Herald, Andrés Oppenheimer column, Miami Herald editorial

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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