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Hundreds March at Solidarity Action in NYC in Fight Against Fossil Fuels

Climate

Tar Sands Blockade

On Nov. 17, hundreds of people marched to JP Morgan Chase in solidarity with the climate week of action. The protesters converged on the steps of the NY Public Library on 42nd Street and then marched to Times Square as part of a global week of action protesting the social, environmental and climatic devastation of the fossil fuel industry, in solidarity with actions by Green Umbrella, Tar Sands Blockade, Push Europe Climate Justice, Occupy Melbourne, 350.org and many grassroots organizations all over the planet.

The group marched to key locations that include bank headquarters and media centers, all of whom are either actively responsible for climate change or are complicit in spreading climate disinformation. More than just a march, this gathering performed a whole range of informative and eye-catching spectacles including everything from eating a giant mountain-shaped cake to staging a news report in a public fountain to mining for coal in the decorative gardens of New York’s financial centers.

Our friends in New York with the Stop SPECTRA Pipeline CoalitionOccupy Sandy Relief NYC and Occupy the Pipeline have seen what climate change looks like—police guarding gas stations as fuel grows thin, furniture upside down along rubble strewn streets, eighty-year-olds trapped in the cold, dark, twentieth floor of housing projects, among many other impacts.

Sadly, much of the world is already familiar with these scenarios; the products of savage inequality and a reckless abhorrence of nature.

Check out the other 40 solidarity actions happening worldwide.

Photo Credit: Daniel Micah

In their Call to Action concerning this event, OccupyWallSt.org said:

Our struggle is global. Now is the time for a mass mobilization of direct action. We call on comrades and allies around the globe to target local sites of dirty power with sit-ins, blockades, pickets, flash mobs, occupations and other forms of nonviolent direct action. Choose a new target or link an existing campaign to this larger movement.

Together we can build a world based on truly renewable energy sources, a world in which health, biodiversity and labor are respected and protected.

System Change, Not Climate Change!

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY and CLIMATE CHANGE pages for more related news on this topic.

 

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