Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

February Astronomical Highlights: 'Humanity Star' and a Trio of Planets

Science
February Astronomical Highlights: 'Humanity Star' and a Trio of Planets
iStock

By Kelly Kizer Whitt

Winter skies display more bright, sparkling stars than other seasons do, and this year especially, the planets have left the stage to give the stars their chance to shine, hovering visibly in the morning sky instead. At the end of the month, brilliant Venus will emerge from the glow of sunset to become the "evening star."


This February, a new "star" is joining the heavens. The company Rocket Lab is launching a satellite called the "Humanity Star" for the sole purpose of adding a bright, flickering light in the sky to "create a shared experience for everyone on the planet." On the one hand, it's wonderful to motivate newcomers to join in stargazing, and it's incredible that once-revolutionary technologies are now commonplace enough to become novelties. But the endeavor does raise some questions.

Do we really need something like this when we already have stars and the moon to observe? And why add to the "space junk" that's already orbiting Earth? The Humanity Star is set to completely burn up and re-enter Earth's atmosphere before the end of the year. The company claims the star will be brighter than all other stars but doesn't share a magnitude estimate. An early video taken of the satellite shows it appearing much like a blinking plane crossing the night sky. The manmade stargazing object has troubled astronomers for setting a precedent of generating unneeded light pollution in space when earthly sources are already making scientific observations challenging. We'll keep an eye out for the interloper and report back any relevant observations.

Amateur astronomers have been tracking satellites for as long as people have been launching them. At Heavens-above.com, you can enter your location and see what objects will be appearing in the sky overhead, from the new Humanity Star to the International Space Station to the Hubble Space Telescope and Iridium satellite flares. Iridium flares are some of the brightest manmade objects that can be seen, appearing as sharp flashes of light when they top out at -7 magnitude and brighter. Brilliant Venus at its brightest only reaches -4.9.

If you're up before the lazy sun this month, you can spot Jupiter highest in the east, leading a chain of planets up from the horizon. Mars and Saturn pepper the dark sky below the king of the planets. Between Feb. 7 and 11, the moon makes this view extra scenic as it visits this trio of planets. Keep an eye on Mars around Feb. 15, when the planet named for the Roman god of war (Ares in Greek), passes Antares (Anti-Ares), a reddish star in Scorpius considered to be Mars's rival. Which one looks more blood-red to you?

Because January and March both host two full moons this year, February has no full moon, which is rare. The last time this happened was in 1999. February does host a partial solar eclipse on Feb. 15 that will be visible in sparsely populated parts of the globe, including the southern reaches of South America and Antarctica.

Reposted with permission from our media associate SIERRA Magazine.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less

Trending

A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less
Woodpecker

Colombia is one of the world's largest producers of coffee, and yet also one of the most economically disadvantaged. According to research by the national statistic center DANE, 35% of the population in Columbia lives in monetary poverty, compared to an estimated 11% in the U.S., according to census data. This has led to a housing insecurity issue throughout the country, one which construction company Woodpecker is working hard to solve.

Read More Show Less
A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less