Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Huge Victory for Solar Power in Georgia

Business
Huge Victory for Solar Power in Georgia

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

In stark contrast to the situation in Arizona, Georgia Power customers with solar panels won't be charged an extra monthly fee.

Georgia Power, the largest subsidiary of Southern Co., made that decision this week, withdrawing a proposal that would have tacked on nearly $30 a month to their utility bills if they installed panels after Jan. 1, according to The Associated Press. The state Public Service Commission can formally accept the decision at meeting on Dec. 17.

"This is a real victory for individuals and businesses that want to use technology to regain some control over their energy bills," Jason Rooks, a lobbyist for the Georgia Solar Energy Industries Association, told The Associated Press. 

However, Georgia Power spokesman John Kraft told WSAV, the Savannah, GA area affiliate of NBC, that he still believes the fee is necessary and would bring it up again "at a later date." The announcement was still enough to make solar users breathe easier.

"Adding an additional tariff or tax, whatever you choose to call it, to a bill that's already high," said Julian Smith, a solar panel installer, "that would be ridiculous. It would slow the entire industry down in the state of Georgia."

Similar to Arizona Public Service, Georgia Power believes solar users aren't paying their fair share in grid costs since many still need additional power from the utility. The Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) believes the utility responded positively to growing opposition.

“Once again, common sense—and overwhelming public support—have prevailed on the side of clean, affordable solar energy," SEIA senior vice president of state affairs Carrie Cullen Hitt said in a statement. "To its credit, Georgia Power sensed an ever-growing opposition to the proposal and has withdrawn it. We urge the Commission to formally accept this decision at its December 17 meeting."

Arizona Public Service (APS) received approval to charge its solar customers late last week. The average customer with 70 kilowatts of solar power will pay nearly $5 per month if they make installations after New Year's Day. APS wanted to charge $50 per month.

In Ohio, legislators are evaluating a bill that would rescind five-year-old renewable energy standards. Researchers from The Ohio State University's Center for Resilience believe enacting the bill would lead to higher payments for energy customers and lost investment opportunities in the renewables sector.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

Eating lots of fruits and vegetables will boost the immune system. Stevens Fremont / The Image Bank / Getty Images

By Grayson Jaggers

The connection between the pandemic and our dietary habits is undeniable. The stress of isolation coupled with a struggling economy has caused many of us to seek comfort with our old friends: Big Mac, Tom Collins, Ben and Jerry. But overindulging in this kind of food and drink might not just be affecting your waistline, but could potentially put you at greater risk of illness by hindering your immune system.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A graphic shows how Rhoel Dinglasan's smartphone-based saliva test works. University of Florida

As the world continues to navigate the line between reopening and maintaining safety protocols to slow the spread of the coronavirus, rapid and accurate diagnostic screening remains critical to control the outbreak. New mobile-phone-based, self-administered COVID-19 tests being developed independently around the world could be a key breakthrough in making testing more widely available, especially in developing nations.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A meteorologist monitors weather in NOAA's Center for Weather and Climate Prediction on July 2, 2013 in Riverdale, Maryland. Mark Wilson / Getty Images

The Trump White House is now set to appoint two climate deniers to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in one month.

Read More Show Less
A plastic bag caught in a tree in New Jersey's Palisades Park. James Leynse / Stone / Getty Images

New Jersey is one step closer to passing what environmental advocates say is the strongest anti-plastic legislation in the nation.

Read More Show Less

Did you know that nearly 30% of adults do, or will, suffer from a sleep condition at some point in their life? Anyone who has experienced disruptions in their sleep is familiar with the havoc that it can wreak on your body and mind. Lack of sleep, for one, can lead to anxiety and lethargy in the short-term. In the long-term, sleep deprivation can lead to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Fortunately, there are proven natural supplements that can reduce insomnia and improve quality sleep for the better. CBD oil, in particular, has been scientifically proven to promote relaxing and fulfilling sleep. Best of all, CBD is non-addictive, widely available, and affordable for just about everyone to enjoy. For these very reasons, we have put together a comprehensive guide on the best CBD oil for sleep. Our goal is to provide objective, transparent information about CBD products so you are an informed buyer.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch