Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Huge Success: Two Years of Zero Rhino Poaching in Nepal

Animals
Huge Success: Two Years of Zero Rhino Poaching in Nepal

Nepal marked two consecutive years since its last rhino was poached on May 2, 2014. This exceptional success is a result of a combination of high-level political will and government entities and the active involvement of conservation communities.

The country achieved two other periods of 365 days each of zero rhino poaching since 2011.

Nepal marked two consecutive years since its last rhino was poached on May 2, 2014. Photo credit: Sumanth Kuduvalli / Felis Creations / WWF

“It takes a whole country to achieve conservation success like zero poaching and Nepal has just done that one more time," said Shubash Lohani, deputy director of World Wildlife Fund's (WWF) Eastern Himalaya Ecoregion program. “This rare success gives us a hope for a better future for rhinos and WWF is proud to be a partner of the Nepali government and people in achieving this success."

Much of the country's zero-poaching achievements is rooted in a coordinated national response that includes improved protection efforts within national parks and surrounding buffer areas and the use of a software system that helps rangers identify poaching hotspots, improve rapid response measures and understand the impact of anti-poaching efforts.

Thanks to these efforts, more than 645 one-horned rhinos now live in Nepal—the highest recorded number in the country so far. These robust protection efforts will continue on, with the hope of reaching an additional 365 days of zero rhino poaching on May 2, 2017.

But as we're celebrating the effective efforts to stop wildlife crime in Nepal, we're also fighting the troubling rise of rhino poaching in Africa. Poachers killed at least 1,338 rhinos in southern Africa in 2015—a new record and the sixth annual increase in a row.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

One of the World's Most Endangered Turtles Nearly Extinct With Fewer Than 10 Left in the Wild

28 Celebrities That Are Vegetarian or Vegan

Watch Racing Extinction: It Will Change the Way You View the World

Neil Young's New Album EARTH Breaks All the Rules

Coast Guard members work to clean an oil spill impacting Delaware beaches. U.S. Coast Guard District 5

Environmental officials and members of the U.S. Coast Guard are racing to clean up a mysterious oil spill that has spread to 11 miles of Delaware coastline.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

What happened to all that plastic you've put in the recycling bin over the years? Halfpoint / Getty Images

By Dr. Kate Raynes-Goldie

Of all the plastic we've ever produced, only 9% has been recycled. So what happened to all that plastic you've put in the recycling bin over the years?

Read More Show Less

Trending

Plain Naturals offers a wide variety of CBD products including oils, creams and gummies.

Plain Naturals is making waves in the CBD space with a new product line for retail customers looking for high potency CBD products at industry-low prices.

Read More Show Less
Donald Trump and Joe Biden arrive onstage for the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 22, 2020. JIM WATSON / AFP via Getty Images

Towards the end of the final presidential debate of the 2020 election season, the moderator asked both candidates how they would address both the climate crisis and job growth, leading to a nearly 12-minute discussion where Donald Trump did not acknowledge that the climate is changing and Joe Biden called the climate crisis an existential threat.

Read More Show Less
What will happen to all these batteries once they wear out? Ronny Hartmann / AFP / Getty Images

By Zheng Chen and Darren H. S. Tan

As concern mounts over the impacts of climate change, many experts are calling for greater use of electricity as a substitute for fossil fuels. Powered by advancements in battery technology, the number of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles on U.S. roads is increasing. And utilities are generating a growing share of their power from renewable fuels, supported by large-scale battery storage systems.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch