Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Hug a Tree in Celebration of Arbor Day

Hug a Tree in Celebration of Arbor Day

During the month of April, in celebration of Arbor Day, The Holden Arboretum is running a social media campaign to promote tree planting and care. The Hug a Tree for Holden project will showcase photos of people hugging trees on Holden’s Facebook and Twitter pages. The public is invited to participate in the project by posting “tree-hugging” photos on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with #hugatreeforholden.

David Burke, chair of Holden Arboretum's research department hugs a giant redwood tree. Photo credit: Holden Arboretum

“We envision a world where trees, forests and gardens provide maximum ecological and social benefits. We hope to show our community how important a deeper connection with trees and nature is, so we are asking the public to get involved,” said Public Relations Specialist Vicki McDonald.

Holden will repost photos to their Facebook and Twitter pages and collect them for display at their Arbor Day festivities April 25 - 27. Arbor Day at The Holden Arboretum is the annual celebration of trees where visitors receive a tree-seedling to plant and can participate in tree-centric activities. Admission to the arboretum during this event is always free.

About Arbor Day:

Arbor Day was founded by J. Sterling Morton in 1872. A newspaper editor and politician, Morton moved from Michigan to Nebraska and organized the first Arbor Day after he decided his new home needed more trees. It became an annual event in Nebraska two years later and quickly caught on around the country to achieve the universal level of celebration it enjoys today. As secretary of agriculture in Grover Cleveland’s second administration, Morton could advocate for trees with even greater reach. Morton stated “Other holidays repose upon the past; Arbor Day proposes for the future.” 

About The Holden Arboretum:

The Holden Arboretum is an outdoor living museum that promotes the beauty and importance of trees and other woody plants to create sustainable and healthy communities in the Great Lakes region and beyond.

 

An Edith's Checkerspot butterfly in Los Padres National Forest in Southern California. Patricia Marroquin / Moment / Getty Images

Butterflies across the U.S. West are disappearing, and now researchers say the climate crisis is largely to blame.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wisdom is seen with her chick in Feb. 2021 at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge / Flickr / CC 2.0

Wisdom the mōlī, or Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known to science at the age of at least 70. She is also, as of February 1, a new mother.

Read More Show Less
Wind turbines in Norway. piola66 / E+ / Getty Images

By Hui Hu

Winter is supposed to be the best season for wind power – the winds are stronger, and since air density increases as the temperature drops, more force is pushing on the blades. But winter also comes with a problem: freezing weather.

Read More Show Less
Jaffa Port in Israel. theDOCK innovated the Israeli maritime space and kickstarted a boom in new technologies. Pixabay

While traditional investment in the ocean technology sector has been tentative, growth in Israeli maritime innovations has been exponential in the last few years, and environmental concern has come to the forefront.

Read More Show Less