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Hug a Tree in Celebration of Arbor Day

During the month of April, in celebration of Arbor Day, The Holden Arboretum is running a social media campaign to promote tree planting and care. The Hug a Tree for Holden project will showcase photos of people hugging trees on Holden’s Facebook and Twitter pages. The public is invited to participate in the project by posting “tree-hugging” photos on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with #hugatreeforholden.

David Burke, chair of Holden Arboretum's research department hugs a giant redwood tree. Photo credit: Holden Arboretum

“We envision a world where trees, forests and gardens provide maximum ecological and social benefits. We hope to show our community how important a deeper connection with trees and nature is, so we are asking the public to get involved,” said Public Relations Specialist Vicki McDonald.

Holden will repost photos to their Facebook and Twitter pages and collect them for display at their Arbor Day festivities April 25 - 27. Arbor Day at The Holden Arboretum is the annual celebration of trees where visitors receive a tree-seedling to plant and can participate in tree-centric activities. Admission to the arboretum during this event is always free.

About Arbor Day:

Arbor Day was founded by J. Sterling Morton in 1872. A newspaper editor and politician, Morton moved from Michigan to Nebraska and organized the first Arbor Day after he decided his new home needed more trees. It became an annual event in Nebraska two years later and quickly caught on around the country to achieve the universal level of celebration it enjoys today. As secretary of agriculture in Grover Cleveland’s second administration, Morton could advocate for trees with even greater reach. Morton stated “Other holidays repose upon the past; Arbor Day proposes for the future.” 

About The Holden Arboretum:

The Holden Arboretum is an outdoor living museum that promotes the beauty and importance of trees and other woody plants to create sustainable and healthy communities in the Great Lakes region and beyond.

 

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