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How Your Tax Dollars Become Twinkies

How Your Tax Dollars Become Twinkies

Ohio PIRG

Federal subsidies for commodity crops are subsidizing junk food additives like high fructose corn syrup, enough to pay for 21 Twinkies per taxpayer every year, according to Ohio PIRG’s new report, Apples to Twinkies 2012. Meanwhile, limited subsidies for fresh fruits and vegetables would buy one half of an apple per taxpayer.

“At a time when childhood obesity rates are skyrocketing, it’s absurd that we’re spending billions of taxpayer dollars to make the problem worse,” said Laura Etherton. “With the Farm Bill about to be reauthorized, it’s time to end this waste.”

Between 1995 and 2011, American taxpayers spent more than $277 billion in agricultural subsidies. The payments are highly concentrated, with 75 percent of the subsidies going to just 3.8 percent of farmers, and they mainly support just a few commodity crops, including corn and soybeans. Among other uses, food manufacturers process corn and soy crops into additives like high fructose corn syrup and vegetable oils that provide a cheap dose of sweetness and fat to a wide variety of junk food products.

Among the report’s key findings:

  • Between 1995 and 2011, $18.2 billion in tax dollars subsidized four common food additives—corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, corn starch and soy oils (better known as hydrogenated vegetable oils). At $7.58 per taxpayer per year, that would buy each taxpayer 21 Twinkies.
  • Outside of commodity crops, other agricultural products receive very little in federal subsidies. Since 1995, taxpayers spent only $637 million subsidizing apples, which is the only significant federal subsidy of fresh fruits or vegetables. Coming to 27 cents per taxpayer per year, that would buy less than half of one Red Delicious apple.
  • Ohio residents’ share of the expense for junk food subsidies is about $39,671,559 each year on average, compared with just $1,388,621 in subsidies for apples. That’s enough to buy 107,365,520 Twinkies, but only 2,861,660 apples.

Childhood obesity rates have tripled over the last three decades, with one in five kids aged 6 to 11 now obese. Research shows that increased snacking is responsible for a significant portion of this increase.

Visit EcoWatch's FOOD and FARM BILL pages for more related news on these topics.

 

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