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How to Build a Wind Turbine From Scratch

Climate

Thanks to filmmaker Jake Beed and the Action4Climate video competition, you can have a first-hand look at what it's like to build a wind turbine from scratch. In If You Build It, watch a group of young Canadians strive for a more sustainable way of life by figuring out how to generate their own power via a homemade wind turbine.

With little to no prior knowledge or experience, the group finds help in the surrounding community's skill sets that all come together to create a moment that will last for as long as the wind blows. This film is inspiring. It shows how you can build a community by building a wind turbine and that passion is the key ingredient to getting things done.

Renewable energy deployment is key to solving global energy issues. Especially in energy poor countries, it's vital that communities embrace clean energy and work on strategies to keep the power generation locally owned.

One great example is in the Dharnai village in Bihar, one of India’s poorest states. The community is now lit-up by a community-owned solar-powered micro-grid. Dharnai is the first village in India where all aspects of life are powered by solar. The 100 kilowatt (kW) system powers the 450 homes of the 2,400 residents, 50 commercial operations, two schools, a training center and a health care facility. A battery backup ensures power around the clock.

“If we are to end extreme poverty, we must tackle energy poverty,” said World Bank Senior Director for Energy & Extractives Anita Marangoly George. “With 1.2 billion people still living without electricity across Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, it’s clear where our work will be focused for the foreseeable future. Our priority is to find the cleanest energy solutions to meet local needs in the smartest ways possible.”

The Action4Climate video competition received more than 230 entries from 70 countries from students inspired to share their climate change stories. To watch other Action4Climate videos, click here.

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