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How Oyster Farms Are Impacted by Climate Change

Climate

Is pollution from fossil fuel emissions killing a $73 million dollar oyster industry? That's the questions answered in the Action4Climate video Just Pearly by filmmaker Kathryn Boyd-Batstone.

The West Coast oyster industry in the U.S., providing more than 3,000 jobs with a total annual economic impact of about $207 million, is being greatly impacted by human-induced climate change. Just Pearly exposes how the death of oyster larvae is evidence of a larger, global issue that needs to be immediately addressed with regards to the state of our oceans.

“We continue to see excessive and irresponsible harvesting in capture fisheries, and in aquaculture, disease outbreaks, among other things, have heavily impacted production,” says Juergen Voegele, Director of Agriculture and Environmental Services at the World Bank. “There is a major opportunity for developing countries that are prepared to invest in better fisheries management and environmentally sustainable aquaculture.”

Just Pearly identifies mitigation practices that are helping keep the oyster industry alive, such as buffering. Sustainable aquaculture will continue to play an extremely important role in the future of this industry.

“Aquaculture will be an essential part of the solution to global food security. We expect the aquaculture industry to improve its practices in line with expectations from the market for sustainable and responsibly produced seafood,” says Jim Anderson, Bank Advisor on Fisheries, Aquaculture and Oceans.

The Action4Climate video competition received more than 230 entries from 70 countries from students inspired to share their climate change stories. To watch other Action4Climate videos, click here.

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