Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

How Much Carbon Do Your State's Coal Plants Emit?

Climate
How Much Carbon Do Your State's Coal Plants Emit?

While the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has a goal of decreasing carbon emissions by 30 percent—compared to 2005 levels—by 2030, states will be given the flexibility to devise their own plans.

Clearly, some will have more work to do than others. Coal-fired power plants are responsible for about 40 percent of the country’s emissions, and states like West Virginia and Kentucky live and die by the dirty source, getting 95 and 90 percent of their power from it, respectively, according to the U.S. Energy Information Agency.

Climate Desk, a nonprofit consortium of eight publications and organizations, including the Center for Investigative Reporting and Huffington Post, created an infographic displaying how much carbon each state emitted, according to 2012 levels. The group analyzed data from the EPA and Natural Resources Defense Council to illustrate that Kentucky basically jumps off the dirty energy chart, while Vermont barely made a blip.

Graphic credit: Climate Desk

"With many more options on the table than simply shuttering coal plants, the rules look less like an Obama “war on coal” and more like an opportunity for states to chart their own course in a less carbon-intensive economy," Climate Desk's Tim McDonnell writes. "One Midwestern utility company has already proposed creating a regional price on carbon that would make electricity from coal more expensive than electricity from other sources, thereby decreasing demand for these plants."

Climate Desk also created a useful timeline leading up to Monday's monumental proposal, giving it the timely title, "Years of Living Cleanly," playing off the first TV series on climate change, Years of Living Dangerously.

Graphic credit: Climate Desk

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Obama and EPA Release Historic Carbon Reduction Plan to Fight Climate Change

——–

54% of parents with school-age children expressed concern that their children could fall behind academically, according to a poll conducted over the summer of 2020. Maria Symchych-Navrotska / Getty Images

By Pamela Davis-Kean

With in-person instruction becoming the exception rather than the norm, 54% of parents with school-age children expressed concern that their children could fall behind academically, according to a poll conducted over the summer of 2020. Initial projections from the Northwest Evaluation Association, which conducts research and creates commonly used standardized tests, suggest that these fears are well-grounded, especially for children from low-income families.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A teenager reads a school English assignment at home after her school shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic on March 22, 2020 in Brooklyn, New York. Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images

The pandemic has affected everyone, but mental health experts warn that youth and teens are suffering disproportionately and that depression and suicide rates are increasing.

Read More Show Less

Trending

In an ad released by Republican Voters Against Trump, former coronavirus task force member Olivia Troye roasted the president for his response. Republican Voters Against Trump / YouTube

Yet another former Trump administration staffer has come out with an endorsement for former Vice President Joe Biden, this time in response to President Donald Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Climate Group

Every September for the past 11 years, non-profit the Climate Group has hosted Climate Week NYC, a chance for business, government, activist and community leaders to come together and discuss solutions to the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district of Germany on Aug. 3, 2020. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Elliot Douglas

The coronavirus pandemic has altered economic priorities for governments around the world. But as wildfires tear up the west coast of the United States and Europe reels after one of its hottest summers on record, tackling climate change remains at the forefront of economic policy.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch