Quantcast

How a 30-Second Video Could Land You a 5 Gyres Expedition Seat

Business

The 5 Gyres Institute is searching for some help with a June expedition to Iceland, and a 30-to-45-second video could land you a spot on its Sea Dragon sailing vessel.

Three years ago, the nonprofit organization found evidence of plastic in all five oceanic current systems as part of the world's first global survey of plastic marine pollution. Now, the group is heading to the Atlantic North from June 7 to June 29 to understand the density and distribution of microplastic pollution across the subtropical and subpolar gyres. The winning contestant will receive airfare to Bermuda and back from Iceland, in addition to an expedition spot. The organization says that prize is worth $10,000.

The winer will be decided by an online vote at 5gyres.org—the same site where people can enter the contest.

A 30-to-45-second video will land somebody a spot on an Iceland expedition to examine plastic pollution distribution across gyres. Photo credit: 5 Gyres

"5 Gyres expeditions are like an activist factory," said Stiv J. Wilson, who joined 5 Gyres after quitting another sea job. "Several other people from our expeditions have gone on to start organizations focused on plastics issues. We empower people with knowledge and an authentic vantage from gyre central to make a difference. And they do."

Video submissions should include an explanation of what the entrant would do with the acquired knowledge and why they should be selected. Anybody can vote online by viewing 5 Gyres' video gallery. The organization is accepting submissions through April 22.

Wilson admits that the price tag on most exhibitions can be cost-prohibitive, which is why the organization wanted to help an individual with the drive and desire to research plastic pollution.

"It's always been our practice on expeditions try to subsidize one of the seats ourselves and invite someone for free," he said. "This time around, we decided to let our community decide who that is."

Sustainable companies and organizations like Packaging 2.0, Klean Kanteen, Manduka, Ocean Care, Zeal Optics, Rainbow Light, Osprey Packs, PLUSfoam and Indosole are all sponsoring the expedition along with 5Gyres.

As 5 Gyres recruits entries for the contest, it reminds people that the expedition won't be the least bit glamorous. In fact, it's "hardcore."

"This isn’t a pleasure cruise, this is a hardcore sailing adventure aboard a working ship where crew will be expected to participate in every aspect of the expedition," according to the institute. "This is includes participating in plastic research, ship navigation and handling and sharing all onboard duties with the other crew."

——–

Related Content:

5 Gyres Institute Sets Sail to Study Plastic Pollution in Lake Michigan

Plastic Pollution in Great Lakes Most Concentrated in the World

New York Sets Precedent By Proposing Nation’s First Microbead Ban

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Locusts swarm from ground vegetation as people approach at Lerata village, near Archers Post in Samburu county, approximately 186 miles north of Nairobi, Kenya on Jan. 22. "Ravenous swarms" of desert locusts in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia threaten to ravage the entire East Africa subregion, the UN warned on Jan. 20. TONY KARUMBA / AFP / Getty Images

East Africa is facing its worst locust infestation in decades, and the climate crisis is partly to blame.

Read More
The Antarctic Peninsula on Feb. 28, 2019. Daniel Enchev / Flickr

By Dan Morgan

Antarctica is the remotest part of the world, but it is a hub of scientific discovery, international diplomacy and environmental change. It was officially discovered 200 years ago, on Jan. 27, 1820, when members of a Russian expedition sighted land in what is now known as the Fimbul Ice Shelf on the continent's east side.

Read More
Sponsored
The seafood market in Wuhan, China that has been linked to the spread of the new coronavirus. HECTOR RETAMAL / AFP via Getty Images

China banned its trade in wild animals Sunday until the new coronavirus, which was linked to a market in Wuhan where wildlife was sold, is eradicated. Now, conservationists are calling on the country to make the ban permanent.

Read More
Coral restoration in Guam. U.S. Pacific Fleet / CC BY-NC 2.0

By Erica Cirino

Visit a coral reef off the coast of Miami or the Maldives and you may see fields of bleached white instead of a burst of colors.

Read More
Cracker Lake, Glacier National Park, Montana. Jacob W. Frank / NPS / Flickr

By Jason Bittel

High up in the mountains of Montana's Glacier National Park, there are two species of insect that only a fly fishermen or entomologist would probably recognize. Known as stoneflies, these aquatic bugs are similar to dragonflies and mayflies in that they spend part of their lives underwater before emerging onto the land, where they transform into winged adults less than a half inch long. However, unlike those other species, stoneflies do their thing only where cold, clean waters flow.

Read More