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12 Houseplants to Refresh Dry Indoor Air

Health + Wellness
12 Houseplants to Refresh Dry Indoor Air
Andrey Nikitin / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Adrienne Santos-Longhurst

Plants are awesome. They brighten up your space and give you a living thing you can talk to when there are no humans in sight.

Turns out, having enough of the right plants can also add moisture (aka humidify) indoor air, which can have a ton of health benefits.


Yep, the right amount of humidity in the air can:

Plants increase humidity in the air through a process called evapotranspiration.

Water from the soil makes its way up through the roots of the plant, through the stems, and up to the leaves (transpiration), where it's evaporated into the air through pores on the leaves, called stomata.

Ready to work on your green thumb? We'll cover which plants to get and which ones to avoid, and even throw in a few pro tips to help you make the most of your plants.

Spider Plant

Spider plants are one of the best plants you can buy for increasing indoor humidity, according to research from 2015.

Even NASA agrees. It did a study in the '80s that found spider plants are able to remove toxins like carbon monoxide and formaldehyde from indoor air.

Perhaps the coolest part of all? They're super easy to grow.

Their stems grow long. A hanging container is best so the plant has room to cascade.

Spider plants grow best in bright, indirect sunlight, so try to keep them near a window that gets a lot of natural light. Aim to keep the soil moist, but not soggy.

Jade Plant

Research shows that a jade plant can increase the relative humidity in a room. Most of its evapotranspiration happens in the dark, making it a good option for increasing humidity during darker months of the year.

To help keep a jade plant thriving, keep it in a bright spot, like near a south-facing window. As for watering, how much you give it depends on the time of the year.

The spring and summer is its active growing time, so you'll want to water it deeply, and wait till the soil is almost dry to water it again.

In the fall and winter, growing slows or stops, so you can let the soil dry completely before watering again.

Areca Palm

Palms tend to be great for adding humidity, and the areca palm — also called the butterfly or yellow palm — is no exception.

They're relatively low maintenance, but they do require lots of sun and moist soil. Keep them near a window that gets a lot of sunlight. Water them enough to keep their soil moist, especially in the spring and summer.

They can grow up to 6 or 7 feet tall and don't like crowded roots, so you'll need to repot it every couple of years as it grows.

English Ivy

English ivy (Hedera helix) is easy to care for and gives you a lot of bang for your buck because it grows like crazy.

It's also been shown to have one of the highest transpiration rates. This makes it a good option for increasing relative humidity AND removing carbon monoxide from indoor air.

A hanging basket is best for this small-leafed ivy. It'll grow as long and lush as you let it. To keep it controlled, just prune to the size you want.

English ivy likes bright light and soil that's slightly dry. Check the soil to make sure it's almost dry before watering again.

Lady Palm

The lady palm is a dense plant that's low maintenance when it comes to sunlight and water needs.

It does best in bright light, but is adaptable enough to grow in low-light spots, too, though at a slightly slower pace.

Lady palms like to be watered thoroughly once the surface is dry to the touch, so always check the soil before watering.

Rubber Plant

The rubber plant isn't as finicky as other indoor tropical plants, making it really easy to care for. Rubber plants also have a high transpiration rate and are great for helping clean indoor air.

Rubber plants like partial sun to partial shade. They can handle cooler temps and drier soil (perfect for people who tend to kill every plant they bring into the home).

Let the soil dry before watering again. In the fall and winter months, you'll be able to cut watering in half.

Boston Fern

The Boston fern has air-purifying properties that add moisture and remove toxins from indoor air. Did we mention they're lush and gorgeous, too?

To keep a Boston fern healthy and happy, water it often enough so the soil is always moist, and make sure it gets a lot of indirect sunlight by placing it in a bright part of the room.

Occasionally misting the fern's leaves with a spray bottle of water can help keep it perky when you have the heat blasting or fireplace going.

Peace Lily

Peace lilies are tropical evergreens that produce a white flower in the summer. They usually grow up to around 16 inches tall, but can grow longer in the right conditions.

A peace lily feels most at home in a room that's warm and gets a lot of sunlight. It takes its soil moist.

No need to stress if you forget to water it on occasion. It'll handle that better than being overwatered.

If you have cats, you'll want to keep this plant out of reach or avoid it. Lilies are toxic to our feline friends.

Golden Pothos

Golden pothos is also called devil's ivy and devil's vine because it's pretty much impossible to kill. You can forget to water it and even forget to give it light for long periods, and it'll still be green whenever you finally remember.

That said, it thrives in brighter spaces and does like some water. Let it dry out between watering.

Its trailing stems grow as long as you want it to, so it's perfect for hanging planters or setting on a higher shelf.

The higher the better if you have pets, though, since some of its compounds are toxic to dogs and cats… and horses, if you happen to live in a big apartment with really relaxed pet rules.

Dwarf Date Palm

Dwarf date palms are also called pygmy date palms. They're perfect as far as plants go. They're basically mini versions of the palm trees you see on tropical postcards.

They can help keep a room's air clean and increase humidity, and are super easy to maintain.

They can grow to be anywhere from 6 to 12 feet tall with bright, indirect sunlight and moist — not soaking wet — soil.

They also prefer a slightly toasty environment, so avoid placing them near a drafty window or source of cold.

Corn Plant

The corn plant won't give you an endless supply of corn — just leaves that look like corn leaves and the occasional bloom if you treat it nice. It also helps humidify indoor air and remove toxic vapors.

Maintenance is easy. Let the top inch or so of soil dry before watering, and keep in a well-lit room where it can get a good amount of indirect sunlight.

Parlor Palm

This is another high-transpiration palm that doesn't take any real skill to grow. You're welcome.

Parlor palms like partial sun, but can manage in full shade, too, as long as you keep the soil consistently moist with a couple of waterings per week.

To help it grow, make sure it's got enough space in the pot by sizing up every year or two, or whenever it starts to look crowded.

Plants to Avoid

Plants are generally good for your environment, but some do have the opposite effect when it comes to humidity.

These plants tend to draw moisture in instead of letting it out. This doesn't happen instantly, and a couple of plants won't have enough of an effect to really zap the moisture out of your home.

Still, if you're looking for maximum moisture, you may want to limit these.

Plants that fall into this category are those that require very little water to survive. Think plants that you find in dry climates, like the desert.

These include plants like:

  • cactuses
  • succulents
  • aloe vera
  • euphorbia, also called "spurge"

Pro Tips

If you really want to take advantage of all the moisture and purification these plants offer, here are some tips to consider:

  • Size matters. Plants with bigger leaves typically have a higher transpiration rate, so go bigger to humidify and purify a room.
  • The more the merrier. Have at least two good-sized plants per 100 square feet of space — more is even better.
  • Keep 'em close. Group your plants closer together to increase the humidity in the air and help your plants thrive, too.
  • Add pebbles. If you're dealing with dry indoor air, put your plants on a pebble tray with water to create more humidity for your plants and your room.

The Bottom Line

If you're looking to combat dry air in your home and have some space, consider stocking up on some houseplants. Just keep in mind that this is one area where less definitely isn't more.

For a noticeable impact on the air in your home, try to have at least several plants in each room. If you only have room for a few plants, try to go for larger ones with big leaves.

Reposted with permission from Healthline. For detailed source information, please view the original article on Healthline.

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Just in time for Halloween, scientists at Cornell University have published some frightening research, especially if you're an insect!

The ghoulishly named ogre-faced spider can "hear" with its legs and use that ability to catch insects flying behind it, the study published in Current Biology Thursday concluded.

"Spiders are sensitive to airborne sound," Cornell professor emeritus Dr. Charles Walcott, who was not involved with the study, told the Cornell Chronicle. "That's the big message really."

The net-casting, ogre-faced spider (Deinopis spinosa) has a unique hunting strategy, as study coauthor Cornell University postdoctoral researcher Jay Stafstrom explained in a video.

They hunt only at night using a special kind of web: an A-shaped frame made from non-sticky silk that supports a fuzzy rectangle that they hold with their front forelegs and use to trap prey.

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But the spiders can also perform a move called the "backward strike," Stafstrom explained, in which they reach their legs behind them and catch insects flying through the air.

"So here comes a flying bug and somehow the spider gets information on the sound direction and its distance. The spiders time the 200-millisecond leap if the fly is within its capture zone – much like an over-the-shoulder catch. The spider gets its prey. They're accurate," coauthor Ronald Hoy, the D & D Joslovitz Merksamer Professor in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior in the College of Arts and Sciences, told the Cornell Chronicle.

What the researchers wanted to understand was how the spiders could tell what was moving behind them when they have no ears.

It isn't a question of peripheral vision. In a 2016 study, the same team blindfolded the spiders and sent them out to hunt, Science explained. This prevented the spiders from making their forward strikes, but they were still able to catch prey using the backwards strike. The researchers thought the spiders were "hearing" their prey with the sensors on the tips of their legs. All spiders have these sensors, but scientists had previously thought they were only able to detect vibrations through surfaces, not sounds in the air.

To test how well the ogre-faced spiders could actually hear, the researchers conducted a two-part experiment.

First, they inserted electrodes into removed spider legs and into the brains of intact spiders. They put the spiders and the legs into a vibration-proof booth and played sounds from two meters (approximately 6.5 feet) away. The spiders and the legs responded to sounds from 100 hertz to 10,000 hertz.

Next, they played the five sounds that had triggered the biggest response to 25 spiders in the wild and 51 spiders in the lab. More than half the spiders did the "backward strike" move when they heard sounds that have a lower frequency similar to insect wing beats. When the higher frequency sounds were played, the spiders did not move. This suggests the higher frequencies may mimic the sounds of predators like birds.

University of Cincinnati spider behavioral ecologist George Uetz told Science that the results were a "surprise" that indicated science has much to learn about spiders as a whole. Because all spiders have these receptors on their legs, it is possible that all spiders can hear. This theory was first put forward by Walcott 60 years ago, but was dismissed at the time, according to the Cornell Chronicle. But studies of other spiders have turned up further evidence since. A 2016 study found that a kind of jumping spider can pick up sonic vibrations in the air.

"We don't know diddly about spiders," Uetz told Science. "They are much more complex than people ever thought they were."

Learning more provides scientists with an opportunity to study their sensory abilities in order to improve technology like bio-sensors, directional microphones and visual processing algorithms, Stafstrom told CNN.

Hoy agreed.

"The point is any understudied, underappreciated group has fascinating lives, even a yucky spider, and we can learn something from it," he told CNN.

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