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House Passes Bill Favoring Polluters over Public Health

House Passes Bill Favoring Polluters over Public Health

Earthjustice

H.R. 4078 would derail critical safeguards aimed at cleaning up our air and water and protecting our wildlife.

On July 26 the U.S. House of Representatives approved the so-called “Red Tape Reduction and Small Business Job Creation Act” (H.R. 4078), a dangerous and irresponsible bill that would halt nearly all significant rulemaking by federal agencies until the nation’s unemployment rate drops to six percent. The bill would derail critical safeguards aimed at cleaning up our air and water, ensuring the safety of our children, protecting our wildlife and increasing the fuel efficiency of our cars and trucks. The bill also contains measures that would unnecessarily gridlock the federal courts, wasting taxpayer resources and interfering with the ability of citizens to receive justice.

The following statement is from Sean Helle, legislative counsel for Earthjustice:

“It’s a shame the House has passed legislation that would slash much-needed protections for our health, safety and welfare in order to please the polluters’ lobby.

“This bill also gives polluters an unprecedented right to obstruct justice in court cases challenging unquestionably illegal activity—cases that are simply and efficiently resolved today.

“The sponsors pitched this measure as being essential to job creation. That’s simply not true. Threatening our food supply, the safety of our drinking water and the viability of other programs that help American families while creating jobs is not a path forward for our nation. The House’s bill is no way to bolster our economy or inspire the American people.”

 

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