Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

House Passes Bill Exposing Communities to Coal Ash

House Passes Bill Exposing Communities to Coal Ash

Sierra Club

The U.S. House of Representatives passed Coal Residuals Reuse and Management Act (H.R. 2273) Oct. 14—a bill that endangers the health and safety of thousands of communities.

In response, Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune issued the following statement:

“It’s no wonder that Rep. David McKinley, who introduced this reckless and dangerous bill, received an ‘F’ for his clean water voting record. Coal ash is a dangerous by-product of burning coal, and contains mercury, arsenic, lead and other life-threatening pollutants that leach into the water supply.

“Outrageously, this dirty and dangerous bill would put a weak scheme in place that requires more protections on household trash than toxic coal ash, even though coal ash pollution includes health risks like cancer, neurological disorders, birth defects, reproductive failure, asthma and other serious illnesses.

“To keep their operating costs as low as possible, however, polluters are digging in their heels and marshaling their pro-polluter allies in Congress against commonsense operating standards and public health protections.

“Rep. McKinley and other members of Congress who voted for H.R. 2273 are catering to polluter interests over the health and well-being of their constituents. This bill is yet another dangerous attack by House leadership on public health protections, and we urge the Senate to reject it.”

For more information, click here.

—————

View the Sierra Club’s new clean water report card here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A northern mockingbird on June 24, 2016. Renee Grayson / CC BY 2.0

Environmentalists and ornithologists found a friend in a federal court on Tuesday when a judge struck down a Trump administration attempt to allow polluters to kill birds without repercussions through rewriting the Migratory Treaty Bird Act (MBTA).

Read More Show Less
A spiny dogfish shark swims in the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of Washington. NOAA / Wikimedia Commons

By Elizabeth Claire Alberts

There are trillions of microplastics in the ocean — they bob on the surface, float through the water column, and accumulate in clusters on the seafloor. With plastic being so ubiquitous, it's inevitable that marine organisms, such as sharks, will ingest them.

Read More Show Less
A "vessel of opportunity" skims oil spilled after the Deepwater Horizon well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010. NOAA / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Loveday Wright and Stuart Braun

After a Japanese-owned oil tanker struck a reef off Mauritius on July 25, a prolonged period of inaction is threatening to become an ecological disaster.

Read More Show Less
The Mountain Valley Pipeline proposes to carry natural gas for hundreds of miles over dozens of water sources, through protected areas and crossing the Appalachian Trail. Appalachian Trail Conservancy / YouTube

It's been a bad summer for fracked natural gas pipelines in North Carolina.

Read More Show Less
Atlantic puffins courting at Maine Coastal Island National Wildlife Refuge in 2009. USFWS / Flickr

When Europeans first arrived in North America, Atlantic puffins were common on islands in the Gulf of Maine. But hunters killed many of the birds for food or for feathers to adorn ladies' hats. By the 1800s, the population in Maine had plummeted.

Read More Show Less
Rescue workers dig through the rubble following a gas explosion in Baltimore, Maryland on Aug. 10, 2020. J. Countess / Getty Images

A "major" natural gas explosion killed two people and seriously injured at least seven in Baltimore, Maryland Monday morning.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The recalled list includes red, yellow, white and sweet yellow onions, which may be tainted with salmonella. Pxhere

Nearly 900 people across the U.S. and Canada have been sickened by salmonella linked to onions distributed by Thomson International, the The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less