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House Committee Votes against Clean Water Act Protections

House Committee Votes against Clean Water Act Protections

Environment America

Today, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee passed Congressman John Mica’s (FL) “Dirty Water Bill” (H.R. 4965) by a 33-18 vote. The bill would block the Obama administration from finalizing and implementing proposed guidelines to restore Clean Water Act protections to many of America’s rivers, lakes, streams and wetlands. The proposed guidelines clarify protection for nearly 60 percent of streams, 20 million acres of wetlands and 117 million Americans’ drinking water—all of which has been inadequately protected for more than a decade thanks to two polluter-driven Supreme Court decisions.
 
Shelley Vinyard, Clean Water advocate for Environment America said:
 
“Congressman Mica’s bill is a true case of polluters versus people. Poll after poll shows that the American public overwhelmingly supports clean water protections, and yet 33 members of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee voted to block a major clean water protection, and what will be the biggest step forward for America’s waterways in more than a decade.

“From the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, we all love and depend on our waterways. Yet just as summer heats up and families flock to their favorite waterways, some in Congress want to give polluters a free pass to pollute these places and threaten the quality of our drinking water.

“We applaud the members of Congress who stood up for clean water today, and are disappointed with those who sided with big polluters and voted for this bill. We are counting on the full House to stand with the public and reject this Dirty Water Bill.”

Visit EcoWatch's CLEAN WATER ACT page for more related news on this topic.
 

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