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6 of the Hottest Places in the World

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By Joe McCarthy

This past June was the third hottest June in recorded history—only 2016 and 2015 had hotter Junes.

The global average temperature has been surpassing the 20th century average for 41 straight years. "Record-breaking temperatures" has almost become a platitude since the turn of the century, yet the consequences of this shift are devastating communities and environments in new ways around the world.


For instance, heat-related deaths are expected to double in urban India by the end of the century. Heat waves are causing extensive crop failures and coral reefs are being cooked alive, undermining entire marine ecosystems. Rising temperatures in the Arctic, meanwhile, threaten to rearrange coastal populations around the world.

Heat waves in the Arctic are a bizarre phenomenon, but heat waves in other parts of the world are normal parts of life.

While adapting to rising heat isn't easy anywhere in the world, these places have a little more experience.

Here are six of the hottest places in the world.

1. Death Valley, U.S.

Simplethrill / Flickr

Death Valley is the driest and hottest place in the U.S. In the summer of 1913, it reached a reported 134 degrees Fahrenheit, the hottest temperature ever recorded.

Wind and water rarely reach this low-slung valley because of surrounding mountain ranges, which means that the air that travels into Death Valley doesn't move much, causing it to heat up as it bakes in the sun.

Not many humans live in Death Valley, but a wide range of plants and animals do call this place home, including bobcats, birds and fish.

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