Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Trump Looks to Bush-Era Energy Lobbyists to Head EPA

Popular

Reuters reports that Jeff Holmstead and Mike Catanzaro, two current energy lobbyists who also served under both former Bush presidents, are among the top contenders to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Trump administration.

Jeff Holmstead (left) and Mike Catanzaro (right).

Holmstead, an attorney with Bracewell, now represents coal and oil industries. Under Bush II, he oversaw the "Clear Skies" legislation that allowed "three times as much mercury as the Clean Air Act."

Catanzaro, a lobbyist at CGCN with clients including Koch Industries and Noble Energy, has worked for former Speaker John Boehner and Oklahoma Sen. James Inhofe. Robert Grady, also a contender for the position, advised Bush I on the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments.

"We are going to fight these rollbacks, if that is what they do, each step of the way. It's going to be a legal battle but it's also going to be a battle in the court of public opinion," David Doniger, director of the climate program at the Natural Resources Defense Council, told Reuters. "Whatever people voted for, they did not vote against climate action, clean air, clean water and environmental protection."

For a deeper dive:

Reuters, The Hill

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Wave power in Portugal. The oceans' energy potential is immense. Luis Ascenso, via Wikimedia Commons

By Paul Brown

The amount of energy generated by tides and waves in the last decade has increased tenfold. Now governments around the world are planning to scale up these ventures to tap into the oceans' vast store of blue energy.

Read More Show Less
Yellowstone National Park closed to visitors on March 24, 2020 because of the Covid-19 virus threat. William Campbell-Corbis via Getty Images

When the novel coronavirus started to sweep across the country, the National Park Service started to waive entrance fees. The idea was that as we started to practice social distancing, Americans should have unfettered access to the outdoors. Then the parking lots and the visitor centers started to fill up, worrying park employees.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Mike Pence and Donald Trump hold a press conference about the coronavirus outbreak in the press briefing room at the White House on March 23, 2020 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

By John R. Platt

Both eyes open. Look for potential threats coming from all sides. Be prepared to change course at a moment's notice.

Read More Show Less
Looking across the Houston Ship Canal at the ExxonMobil Refinery, Baytown, Texas. Roy Luck, CC BY 2.0

By Nick Cunningham

A growing number of refineries around the world are either curtailing operations or shutting down entirely as the oil market collapses.

Read More Show Less
Traffic moves across the Brooklyn Bridge on Aug. 2, 2018 in New York City. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

The Trump administration is expected to unveil its final replacement of Obama-era fuel-efficiency standards for cars and light trucks Tuesday in a move likely to pump nearly a billion more tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere over the lifetime of those less-efficient vehicles.

Read More Show Less