Quantcast

Hillary Clinton Opposes Offshore Drilling, Vows to Look Into Fossil Fuel Industry Donations

Politics

When asked by Steve Patterson, a leader of local group 350 Iowa, about pledging not to accept money from the fossil fuel industry, Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton responded by revealing her full opposition to offshore drilling and vowed to further look into any donations she has received from the fossil fuel industry.

“Clinton said that she doesn’t think there are a lot of people who support her who have ties to fossil fuels, but as it turns out, nearly every one of her top bundlers are connected with the industry in some way. That raises some serious concerns,” said Yong Jung Cho, Campaign Coordinator with 350 Action. “Clinton will have to continue to demonstrate a firmer commitment to keep fossil fuels in the ground if she wants to win over the trust of people who are concerned that the likes of ExxonMobil still have a stranglehold on our government.”

An analysis by the Huffington Post concluded that nearly all of Clinton’s top bundlers have ties with the fossil fuel industry. They include the likes of ExxonMobil executive Theresa Mary Fariello, who raised $21,200 for the Clinton campaign and Gordon Giffin, a former lobbyist for TransCanada, the company who tried to build Keystone XL, who has raised more than $100,000. Meanwhile, the Clinton Global Initiative has accepted millions of dollars from major fossil fuel companies like Exxon and Chevron, along with Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest oil exporter.

Clinton’s opposition to drilling off the coast of the U.S. comes months after she expressed her opposition to drilling in the Arctic in order to keep fossil fuels in the ground.

Transcript:

Steve Patterson: Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley have both committed to not take money from the fossil fuel industry. Would you be willing to sign a pledge that you will not take money from the fossil fuel industry?

Hillary Clinton: Well, I don’t know that I ever have. I’m not exactly one of their favorites.

Patterson: You have.

Clinton: I’ll check on that. They certainly haven’t made much of an impression on me if I didn’t even know it. Look, I am committed to moving away from fossil fuels toward clean, renewable energy … I just told an interviewer that I was doing a phone interview with in South Carolina, I am not in favor of drilling off of our coasts. I was out there first, before even the President, saying no drilling the Arctic…

later…

Clinton: Individuals who might have some connection to whatever industry, I’m not going to do a litmus test on them. I don’t think that there’s a lot who support me, but the companies don’t, because they know I’m going to be very adamant about moving us towards clean renewable energy and I think that’s the way it should be. They should know where we’re going and how I’m going to try and get you there.

later…

I’ll take a look at what I’ve already gotten and obviously I will do everything I can to know that everyone who gives me money knows exactly what I’m going to do when I am elected, there’s no doubt about that.

Patterson: So, you will commit to not, if you are getting their money, to stop taking it?

Clinton: Well, I’m going to take a look and see ... I mean, you’re asking me a question I never pay any attention to because they don’t actually come and talk to me. I think they think I’m a lost cause.

350 Action is working in primary states to urge candidates for president to take bold action on climate change by pledging to keep fossil fuels in the ground and support a just transition to a 100 percent renewable energy.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Leonardo DiCaprio Is at It Again, Invests in Energy Technology Company Zuli

Watch Colbert Unleash on Trump in Hilarious GOP Debate Recap

Lifting Crude Oil Export Ban Locks in Fossil Fuel Dependency for Decades to Come

What if Americans Stopped Driving for Just One Day?

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Kokia drynarioides, commonly known as Hawaiian tree cotton, is a critically endangered species of flowering plant that is endemic to the Big Island of Hawaii. David Eickhoff / Wikipedia

By Lorraine Chow

Kokia drynarioides is a small but significant flowering tree endemic to Hawaii's dry forests. Native Hawaiians used its large, scarlet flowers to make lei. Its sap was used as dye for ropes and nets. Its bark was used medicinally to treat thrush.

Read More Show Less
Frederick Bass / Getty Images

States that invest heavily in renewable energy will generate billions of dollars in health benefits in the next decade instead of spending billions to take care of people getting sick from air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels, according to a new study from MIT and reported on by The Verge.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A couple works in their organic garden. kupicoo / E+ / Getty Images

By Kristin Ohlson

From where I stand inside the South Dakota cornfield I was visiting with entomologist and former USDA scientist Jonathan Lundgren, all the human-inflicted traumas to Earth seem far away. It isn't just that the corn is as high as an elephant's eye — are people singing that song again? — but that the field burgeons and buzzes and chirps with all sorts of other life, too.

Read More Show Less
Aerial view of lava flows from the eruption of volcano Kilauea on Hawaii, May 2018. Frizi / iStock / Getty Images

Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could be gearing up for an eruption after a pond of water was discovered inside its summit crater for the first time in recorded history, according to the AP.

Read More Show Less
A competitor in action during the Drambuie World Ice Golf Championships in Uummannaq, Greenland on April 9, 2001. Michael Steele / Allsport / Getty Images

Greenland is open for business, but it's not for sale, Greenland's foreign minister Ane Lone Bagger told Reuters after hearing that President Donald Trump asked his advisers about the feasibility of buying the world's largest island.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
AFP / Getty Images / S. Platt

Humanity faced its hottest month in at least 140 years in July, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said on Thursday. The finding confirms similar analysis provided by its EU counterparts.

Read More Show Less
Newly established oil palm plantation in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay

By Hans Nicholas Jong

Indonesia's president has made permanent a temporary moratorium on forest-clearing permits for plantations and logging.

It's a policy the government says has proven effective in curtailing deforestation, but whose apparent gains have been criticized by environmental activists as mere "propaganda."

Read More Show Less
jurgita.photography / Moment / Getty Images

By Grace Francese

Outbreaks of potentially toxic algae are fouling lakes, rivers and other bodies of water across the U.S. Nationally, news reports of algae outbreaks have been on the rise since 2010.

Read More Show Less