Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Hidden Camera Prank Exposes Absurdity of Climate Deniers' Arguments

Climate

One doesn't have to look far to find a political figure espousing the classic climate denier viewpoints. Earlier this year, Sen. James Inhofe threw a snowball on the Senate floor in the middle of winter in Washington, DC, as "proof" that global warming is a "hoax."

A little over a week ago, Donald Trump tweeted that it was recently cold on one particular day in New York City, so of course there's no such thing as global warming.

And earlier this week, Sen. Ted Cruz told Glenn Beck that "global warming alarmists" don't have the evidence to prove that the planet is warming. "Climate change is not a science. It's a religion," Cruz said.

If only there were a way to show what these arguments looked like in a more simplified manner. Well, now there is. Upworthy—with the help of the UN Secretary-General's Climate Change Support Team and Unilever—put together a little social experiment to highlight the absurdity of climate deniers' arguments. And they did it using a hidden camera.

Here's a little background via Upworthy:

A handful of unsuspecting temporary employees were brought in to work for a company, but this wasn't a regular office—the other employees were actors.

Then there's this hilarious detail: The temporary workers arrived to find the thermostat broken and the temperature climbing throughout the day.

As the temp workers and the actors around them started to become unbearably hot, they finally decided it was time to speak up to the boss.

Watch here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Watch This Alarming Video of Ted Cruz Attacking Climate Change as a Religion

Stephen Colbert’s Hilarious Takedown of the GOP Debate

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The moon sets over the border fence between the U.S. and Mexico on March 14, 2017 in Hidalgo, Texas. John Moore / Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic, President Donald Trump found time earlier this week to sign an executive order for U.S. companies to mine the moon's mineral resources, according to Newsweek.

Read More Show Less
Workers unload boxes of medical supplies at Mount Sinai Hospital amid the coronavirus pandemic on March 31, 2020 in New York City. Spencer Platt / Getty Images

The supply chain that provides medical supplies to the world is favoring the U.S. and Europe, which are outbidding poorer nations for masks, gowns, gloves and ventilators during the coronavirus pandemic, according to NPR.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

A garbage yard in Lucknow, India where plastic bottles are dumped before being sent to recycling. Abhimanyu Kumar Sharma / Moment / Getty Images

Scientists have engineered a mutant enzyme that converts 90 percent of plastic bottles back to pristine starting materials that can then be used to produce new high-quality bottles in just hours. The discovery could revolutionize the recycling industry, which currently saves about 30 percent of PET plastics from landfills, reported Science Magazine.

Read More Show Less
A woman drinks tea inside her home. martin-dm / Getty Images

Cabin fever is often associated with being cooped up on a rainy weekend or stuck inside during a winter blizzard.

In reality, though, it can actually occur anytime you feel isolated or disconnected from the outside world.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pope Francis delivers his homily on April 9, 2020 behind closed doors at St. Peter's basilica in the Vatican. ALESSANDRO DI MEO / POOL / AFP via Getty Images

Pope Francis spoke about the novel coronavirus, suggesting that the global pandemic might be one of nature's responses to the man-made climate crisis.

Read More Show Less