Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Help Us Respond to Disasters on Our Waterways

Help Us Respond to Disasters on Our Waterways

Waterkeeper Alliance is an independent voice for the environment and communities during natural and human made disasters. Please consider donating to our Indiegogo Rapid Response campaign to ensure we can respond to disasters faster and farther afield.

Right now in Bangladesh, local Waterkeepers are on the ground responding to an unprecedented catastrophe in the Sundarbans, one of the world’s most unique natural habitats. They are working around the clock advocating for the government to take sound actions in cleaning up the state-owned Padma Oil Company’s spill of 348,000 liters of oil by calling for an immediate stop to untrained local community members, particularly children, cleaning up oil, as well as the movement of commercial vessels through the mangrove forest to protect this UNESCO World Heritage site. Waterkeeper responders are in the thick of this disaster, providing a voice for the surrounding communities, rivers and creeks of the Sundarbans.

Children clean oil with hay in Bangladesh. Photo credit: Syed Saiful Alam, volunteer of Buriganga Riverkeeper

Rapidly responding to disasters is one of our key strengths. Early last year, Waterkeeper Alliance and North Carolina Riverkeepers were on the scene when a collapsed stormwater pipe released 140,000 tons of toxic coal ash sludge and wastewater into the Dan River in North Carolina, a public drinking water supply for downstream communities like Danville, Virginia. The Waterkeeper team was on site within 36 hours, collecting samples, documenting the impacts and rapidly sharing information with the public and news media. The Waterkeeper Rapid Response team proved to be an invaluable resource, as Duke Energy, the company responsible for the spill, waited more than 24 hours before notifying the public it had happened and did its best to cover up the real threats to people and the environment.

Coal ash spills on the Dan River. Photo credit: Waterkeeper Alliance / Rick Dove

The Waterkeeper Alliance Rapid Response Team initiative is an innovative solution that provides trusted and independent emergency response to disasters on our waterways. Your support today will help us protect waterways and threatened communities when the next tragedy strikes.

Headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva amid the COVID-19 outbreak on Aug. 17, 2020. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP via Getty Images

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced Monday that 64 high-income nations have joined an effort to distribute a COVID-19 vaccine fairly, prioritizing the most vulnerable citizens, as Science reported. The program is called the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access Facility, or Covax, and it is a joint effort led by the WHO, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Exterior of Cold Tube demonstration pavilion. Lea Ruefenacht

By Gloria Oladipo

In the face of dangerous heat waves this summer, Americans have taken shelter in air conditioned cooling centers. Normally, that would be a wise choice, but during a pandemic, indoor shelters present new risks. The same air conditioning systems that keep us cool recirculate air around us, potentially spreading the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A Botswana elephant stands in a body of water. Geschenkpanda / Pixabay

Toxins in water produced by cyanobacteria was likely responsible for more than 300 elephant deaths in Botswana this year, the country's wildlife department announced on Monday.

Read More Show Less
Activists gather in John Marshall Park for the Global Climate Strike protests on September 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. Samuel Corum / Getty Images

By Alexandra Villarreal

As West coast wildfires color the skies dystopian red and orange and an aggressive hurricane season batters the U.S. Gulf coast, college students are demanding their schools take bold action to address the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
A portion of roadway is flooded in Corpus Christi, Texas on Sept. 20, 2020 due to storm surge from Tropical Storm Beta in the Gulf of Mexico. Matt Pierce / iStock Editorial / Getty Images Plus

The National Hurricane Center has run out of names for tropical storms this year and has now moved on to the Greek alphabet during an extremely active hurricane season. Late Monday night, Tropical Storm Beta became the ninth named storm to make landfall. That's the first time so many named storms have made landfall since 1916, when Woodrow Wilson was president, according to NBC News.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch