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Help Stop Mountaintop Removal at Mountain Mobilization July 25 - Aug. 1

Energy
Help Stop Mountaintop Removal at Mountain Mobilization July 25 - Aug. 1

Energy Action Coalition and Appalachia Rising

This summer young people and community organizations are stepping up the fight against mountaintop removal with a major Mountain Mobilization in West Virginia from July 25 - Aug. 1.

Organized by the RAMPS Campaign, the mobilization will bring hundreds together in nonviolent direct action—occupying a strip mine to do what politicians, regulators and the courts have been unwilling to do: defend the land and the people.

Join people from all walks of life at the Mountain Mobilization to shut down an active mountaintop removal site in West Virginia.

At PowerShift 2011, imprisoned activist Tim DeChristopher said:

“With only the people in this room, we could send 30 people onto a mountaintop removal site, shut it down temporarily, start to clog up the West Virginia court system. And we could send 30 people the day after that and the day after that and the day after that every day for a year. I believe we would never get to the end of that year because mountaintop removal would end before we reached that point.”

Will you join us?

For more information and to register, click here.

The success of this depends on your participation. We are all in a David versus Goliath struggle for our future, but Goliath is starting to stumble. With our survival at stake, we can unite and we can win.

Visit EcoWatch's MOUNTAINTOP REMOVAL page for more related news on this topic.

 

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